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OZETTE AREA



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AHLSTROM CABIN



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Ahlstrom Cabin

Ahlstrom Homestead 1940 spacer Cabin in Ahlstrom Area

Photo 1 from Karen at NWHikers.net (Ahlstrom Cabin - 1940) - Photo 2 from Malachi Constant 200 at NWHikers.net (Cabin in area)

Ahlstrom's Cabin

Photo from RodF at NWHikers.net

Lars Ahlstrom

Document from Damlan at NWHikers.net - Lars Ahlstrom


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Located about one and one-half miles west of Ozette Lake and adjoining the Peter Roose homestead, the Ahlstrom homestead of approximately 160 acres was established almost concurrently with the Roose homestead around 1908. These two Ozette Lake settlers were among the second wave of Scandinavian pioneer settlers to arrive at Ozette Lake. (The first contingent of settlers established homesteads in the Ozette Lake area between the late 1880s and 1897 when the area came under Federal jurisdiction and discouraged further settlement.) Following Ahlstrom's arrival on land now known as Ahlstrom's Prairie, he erected a two-story house, two barns, a shed, a chicken house, and fences. In the late 1920s or early 1930s, Ahlstrom's house succumbed to accidental fire. In its place he erected a small one-story structure using large cedar tree trunks for corner qugp.9rts. The existing structure is Ahlstrom's second home. The building is presently being overgrown by salmonberry and is in deteriorated condition. L-shape plan; measures 16' x 28'; 1 story; wood-frame and pole with vertical, rough sawn boards and hand split cedar board and battens; tree trunk incorporated into 1 wall; modified gable roof with cedar shakes; no foundation; various window types including double-hung sash with wide, plain board surrounds; creative use of materials and setting. Alterations are not apparent. Siting: surrounded by dense thicket of salal; approx. 50' from barn.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Ahlstrom Cabin is ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The building is most likely less than fifty years old. As part of a complex of farm buildings, and at one time surrounded by cleared fields delineated by fences, nearly total encroachment of native vegetation has erased nearly all visible signs of Ahlstrom's farm property. Neither the cabin nor the potential rural historic district retains substantial integrity of design, setting, feeling, and association.



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OZETTE HISTORY



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Music, provided by the "Ozette Lake Orchestra," entertained settlers in the remote, predominantly Scandinavian Oette Lake community. (Courtesy Olympic National Park)


Kyaking on Lake Ozette spacer Water Lily on Lake Ozette spacer Preacher Point - Ozette Lake


Lake Ozette photos taken by Neil Robin. Here are his comments.

We started from Swan bay and paddled as far as Preacher's Point before the weather was becoming a consideration. After we got back the rain drove us ultimately home to try another weekend.

Preacher's Point is where the old church was located but is currently private property for about another 7 years and then its back to the NPS. A very nice well kept home sits on the point as you can see. Wonder what the Park Service will do with it?

The other two pictures were taken on the eastern side of Garden Island. This area is famous for its Lotus Lilly's as you can see. We met up with a lady that was canoeing at Bensons Point who lived in the area for many years. She told us all about the house boats and hippies that were along the Big River just to the east. We went up the river a short distance but it looks like you could navigate quite a ways with Kayaks. She told us that ruins at the entrance have all but vanished now because of the growth of vegatation. We didn't moor the boats in that area so my investigation will have to wait till another time. The sweat house at Benson Point is still there and she said it was built in the 50's.

In talking to one of the Ranger's, he said that some of the land will remain private. Each original property owner was able to strike up more or less their own deal. I was thinking that everything would resort to government land in time.... but that's not true. Several cabins are still alive and well, particulary between Umbrella Bay and Swan Bay. They are rented out as a primitive getaway. The state of repair varies. Access is only by water with maybe one or two exceptions. I was told that Seafield will remain private property.

Rob, who owns the Lost Resort has lots of old pictures of the early settlers plus a video of the Nylund family.

My intention is to explore all around the lake via Kayak but it may take me 2-3 years. It seems like everytime I meet someone who is familiar with the area, I learn something new. One of the ranger's was very helpful as he's also a kayaker and told us where the nice sandy beaches are located. We stopped at one on Boot Bay and it would be a nice spot for boat-in camping. If you can get a little luck with the weather, Lake Ozette has got to be one of the best Kayaking and Canoeing lakes around.

Regards, Neil

The Robin Family Home Page - http://robin-wood.com

From Historic Resource Study 1983 Olympic National Park
By Gail E. H. Evans and T. Allan Comp
Cultural Resources Division
National Park Service

Ozette Lake, whose western shore line is approximately two miles east of the Pacific Ocean, had a heavy concentration of homesteaders prior to 1900. It is the third largest freshwater lake in the state of Washington, and the relatively flat land surrounding it was reputed to be "good agricultural land." In 1892 U.S. Deputy Surveyor Lewis Shelton reported that "a large portion of the hill lands are almost first class in quality and will produce large crops of potatoes, turnips, and other vegetables, hops, oats, apples, pears, plums, cherries and small fruits" (DNR Maps and Surveys). At the time of the General Land Office survey, most of the land in T. 30 N., R. 15 W., encompassing the majority of the lake, was already taken by settlers. In 1892 a total of thirty-three settlers with improvements valued at more than $11,000 ringed Ozette Lake (DNR Maps and Surveys). In ensuing years the population of Ozette Lake and the Big River Valley to the northeast peaked at about 130 families (NPS OLYM 1967, 5). Around the lake, homestead sites were only one-half to one mile apart (DNR Maps and Surveys).

In the early 1890s Ozette Lake harbored a distinctly isolated colony of settlers that was remarkably self-contained. For many years the only access to the lake from other peninsula communities was by ship to the mouth of Ozette River, which emptied into the ocean from the lake, or by a twenty-five mile trail along the Hoko River to a small settlement at Clallam Bay on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Early In the history of the community, settlers in the area attempted to satisfy their subsistence, social, and educational needs. One homesteader established a partnership with a ship schooner captain to get supplies from Seattle through the Strait of Juan de Fuca and around Cape Flattery. The first trading post was set up in the home of a west shore resident. Later, other stores were located elsewhere on the lake. At one time there were three post offices at strategic points on the lake and up the Big River Valley to the northeast. Two schools were established in the homes of lakeside residents; one on the West Side in 1892 and a second on the East Side four years later. Finally, members of the community erected a schoolhouse on one acre of land donated by a homesteader. Again through a community effort, a church was constructed in the mid-1990s, which also served as the parsonage for the resident minister (Arbeiter 1971a, 495-500; NPS OLYM ca. 1967, 4, 16-20). The jutting promontory where this early church stood is now known as Preacher Point.

The ethnic homogeneity of the Ozette Lake community was a distinctive feature of this isolated peninsula settlement. After the pioneering settlers (N. P. Andrews, J. E. Johnson, Ole Boe, Ole Klaboe, and the Isaksen and Johnson families) first arrived at Ozette Lake in 1889, word of the promise and possibilities of free agricultural land in the area quickly spread to the friends and families of the original group. Homesteaders, predominantly of Scandinavian extraction quickly took up Land around the lake. Many were first generation emigrants from Norway and Denmark. Some of the area's early settlers' surnames, such as Andrews, Borseth, Christensen, Erickson, Jorgenson, Nielsen, Overguard, and Pedersen, reflect these national origins (Arbeiter 1971b, 510-16).

This Isolated Scandinavian community aimed at self-sufficiency. Clearing the land was accomplished by felling trees by hand with an axe or cross cut saw. Large trees were removed by slowly burning the lower trunk with hot coals implanted in the base until the diameter was small enough to cut. Homes, barns, and outbuildings were constructed primarily of sawn cedar planks. Most of the settlers engaged in farming, planting timothy, hay, potatoes, other vegetables, and fruit trees. A few area residents, later on, cultivated cranberries, which grew wild in some sections around the lake. Cows were brought in as early as 1891, and soon sheep and pigs were added to the stock. After herds were built-up, the surplus of cream and butter, as well as quarters of beef and pork, were packed out over the trail to Clallam Bay or taken to a small warehouse at Sand Point on the coast where they were shipped to Port Angeles or Seattle. Ozette Lake residents were not, however, able to sustain themselves through their efforts working with the land. Later, some even experimented with mining for gold on the coastal beaches just west of the Take (Arbeiter 1971a, 498-99; NPS OLYM ca. 1967, 11-14).

The Scandinavian community was short-lived. In 1897 when Ozette Lake was included in the newly established two-million-acre Olympic Forest Reserve, many settlers left, abandoning their homes, tools, and heavier possessions that had been difficult to transport to the lake. Prospects of expanding their community and gaining road access seemed dim (NPS OLYM ca. 1967, 20; 1937, 13). Early Ozette resident Ole Boe wrote in his memoirs: "It is like after the black death in Norway in 1300 when there remained only an isolated human here and there after the pestilence" (Douglas 1964, 181). By 1899 most of the early settlers had moved away (Arbeiter 1971 a, 498). Among those who stayed were Henry Borseth on Swan Bay; Ole and Sarah Erickson on Erickson Bay; August and Annie Palmquist and Ander (or Anders) and Johanna Nylund, both on the north end of the lake (NPS OLYM 1937, 13; Arbeiter 1971b, 511-14). Today the only tangible evidence of this early group of settlers in Olympic National Park is the cemetery plot of the Nylund family a short distance north of Ozette Lake near the site of the family home and now enclosed by a picket fence. A white cross marks the grave of Ander Nylund, who died at age sixty-four in 1920. His son, Alfred, lies beside him.

The life of the Nylund family at Ozette Lake was similar to so many other early settlers in the area. Ander and Johanna were natives of Scandinavia (Finland and Sweden, respectively) and immigrated to Seattle in the late 1880s. After hearing of the Scandinavian colony at Ozette, they, with their two daughters, traveled by steamer and footpath to the lake in the spring of i895. For ten years the family occupied an abandoned house on the north end of the lake, while Ander and Johanna worked to clear land, plant hay, fruit trees, and vegetable gardens. Cows, chickens, pigs and eventually sheep were acquired. In season Ander fished in the Ozette River and hunted for deer, ducks and geese, and other wild game. Sometimes he left home for months to work in a mine at Port Blakely. Johanna carded wool and spun thread from which she knitted, crocheted, and sewed clothing (Alcorn and Alcorn 1962, 151-54).

In 1904 Ander Nylund began building a new house. A year later the two-story, nine-room house with cedar siding, a split shakes roof, and wide woods flooring was completed. A large barn and various outbuildings completed the complex of buildings on the Nylund homestead. One by one, the Nylund children (Hulda, Inga, Annie, and Ida) left the homestead to marry, (Alfred died in 1928, at the age of thirty, from unknown causes.) After Ander Nylund died in 1920, Johanna remarried in 1932 and moved away from the Ozette Lake homestead. The Nylund house was never permanently occupied again (Alcorn and Alcorn 1962, 152, 155).

Gradually the buildings on the Nylund homestead deteriorated and fell down. By the late 1940s, most of the small outbuildings had crumbled; by the early 1960s, the barn had collapsed and the house was overgrown with brush and entwined with ivy (Alcorn and Alcorn 1962, 155-56). In the mid-1960s only the shell of the Nylund house remained standing (NPS OLYM 1964, 18 February).

Just after the turn of the century, land bordering Ozette Lake was reopened for homesteading and a second wave of settlers arrived in the area. Many of these new arrivals moved into houses abandoned by the earlier settlers and pursued a lifestyle similar to their predecessors. Among the group of latter settlers were A. C. Alien, F. H, Nourse, T. Potier, Albert R. Leake, Charles W. Keller, Henry Beldon, and Bertie Caywood (Arbeiter 1971a, 498; NPS OLYM ca. 1967, 21, 27). Lars Ahlstrom and Peter Roose, who were among the second generation of settlers to Ozette area, established their homesteads one and half to two miles west of Ozette Lake.

Peter Roose (born Arvard Hammerlund) and Lars Ahlstrom, like the first generation of Ozette Lake settlers, were Scandinavian. Born in Sweden, they immigrated to the United States as young men and arrived at Ozette Lake within ten years after the area was reopened for settlement. After becoming U.S. citizens, they filed for adjoining homesteads of approximately 160 acres apiece. Their neighboring claims were in open prairie land one and one-half miles west of Ozette Lake (NPS OLYM 1977, 22 March; 1980, 23 August).

Early years on their respective homesteads were occupied with constructing living quarters, farm buildings and fences, cultivating land, and acquiring farm animals. Peter Roose at first built a log cabin structure for a house, and over the years added a shed, barn, root house, sawmill, and endless yards of wood fences. Lars Ahlstrom erected a two-story frame house as well as two barns, a shed, a chicken house, and fences. Roose and Ahlstrom followed similar patterns in their life ways. They each cultivated small plots of land and grew vegetables and fruit such as potatoes, carrots, onions, rutabagas, strawberries, and raspberries. These they primarily for personal consumption. They raised chickens were principally for their eggs. Both Roose and Ahlstrom acquired flocks of sheep. By 1916, Peter Roose reportedly owned eighty to one hundred head of sheep '(NPS OLYM 1977, 22 March). While occasionally the sheep were slaughtered for their meat, their wool, which was marketed in Seattle, was the principal commodity. To earn needed cash for supplies and equipment that they were unable to provide through their own labors, both men left their homesteads for several weeks each year to log, work in lumber mills, or to take a variety of seasonal jobs in the area (NPS OLYM 1977, 22 March).

In the 1ate 1920s and 1930s Lars Ahlstrom and Peter Roose replaced their original dwellings with new homes. After fire destroyed Ahlstrom's home in the late 1920s or early 1930s, he built a small one-story structure, using large cedar tree trunks for corner supports. Roose, apparently after converting a Model A car engine to mill machinery, sawed his own lumber and erected a new house In the late 1930s (NPS OLYM 1977, 22 March; 1980, 23 August). Although Lars Ahlstrom's second house is considerably overgrown and deteriorated, both it and Peter Roose *s second home, plus a few farm buildings on both homesteads, remain standing today. In 1983 Ahlstrom and Roose's homestead structures and small segments of picket and split rail fences are the only remaining testaments of the pioneering settlement way of life near Ozette Lake.

Some of the earliest settlers in the Ozette area claimed land on the prairie west of Ozette Lake and along the Pacific Ocean beaches. Before 1900, many prairie and beach residents were Scandinavian and were relatives or friends of the nearby Ozette Lake ethnic colony. Charles Willoughby and W. L, Ferguson established the first store in the area on the ocean at the mouth of Ozette River and. no doubt, supplied goods to many early immigrants who landed on the beach and trekked inland to the lake via a trail along the Ozette River. Sam Pederson, who eventually established the first store on the West Bank of Ozette Lake, was at first in charge of packing freight for early settlers over the trail between the ocean beach and the take. A. H. and Minnie Davis were among the earliest settlers to the area and claimed a homestead on the Ozette River between the lake and the beach (Arbeiter 1971a, 497; Ramsey 1978, 94, 103).

Other early Scandinavian settlers built crude cabins along the beach, usually by fresh-water creeks. Henry and Hilda Borseth and Iver Birkestol arrived in the early 1890s. Louis Larsen, John Substad, James Grant, W. Bank, C. Turner, and Arnold Wink also built homes on or near the ocean (Arbeiter 1971b, 511-161 DNR Maps and Surveys). Near the mouth of Petroleum Creek (In the area now called Shi Shi Beach), two members of the Loveless family staked claims (DNR Maps and Surveys). Often the early coastal residents were interested not only in farming but also in mining for gold. Although many early coastal residents eventually moved their homesteads inland to Ozette Lake or ventured to Alaskan gold fields, it was not rare for the agrarian lakeside settlers to look to ocean beach placer mining operations for a supplemental income (ST 1961, 5 November).

The long-anticipated and hoped-for road that would break the isolation of the Ozette community did not arrive until after many settlers had come and gone. It was not until 1926 that a road between Clallam Bay and Swan Bay at the East Side of the lake was completed. Another nine years passed before cars could be driven to the Ozette River at the north end of the lake. Electricity arrived at the lake in the early 1960s (NPS OLYM ca. 1967, 211 1937. 19).

In 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the Public Works Administration to acquire the Ozette Lake area, as well as part of a long, narrow coastal strip, for inclusion in Olympic National Park. Eleven years later, in a memorandum written to the regional director of the National Park Service requesting professional assistance in evaluating historical values in the Ozette area, Olympic National Park Superintendent Preston Macy noted: The Lake Ozette area represents the "last frontier". . . . Most of these [Scandinavian] people abandoned their lakeshore homesteads many years ago, but they created them in real pioneer fashion. Practically all of the buildings have deteriorated beyond repair; in fact, many, if not most of them are gone (NPS OLYM 1951).



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ROOSE CABIN



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Roose Cabin spacer ROOSE CABIN

ROOSE CABIN
Photo from RodF from NWHikers.net


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed by homesteader Peter Roose, the existing Roose Cabin succeeded an earlier log house. It was probably completed in the late 1930s. Since the time of his arrival in the Ozette Lake area around 1908, Peter Roose constructed a number of buildings on his homestead claim including a shed, barn, root house, sawmill, and sheep barn. The Roose Cabin is one of three buildings that remain standing. The existing open fields, broken by short sections of picket and split rail fences surrounding the Roose Cabin, complete this pioneer settlement historic district. (See Inventory card Nos. 1217-1219, 1279.) In the early 1980s the National Park Service undertook minimal restoration of the floor joists of the structure. Rectangular in shape; measures 12'6" x 26'4"; 1 story; wood-frame wall construction with horizontal clapboard siding; gable roof with shakes; post and pier foundation (set on temporary posts in 1982); double-hung sash, and multi-light, fixed sash windows with wide plain board surrounds; functional stick work in one gable end. Alterations: roof re-shingled and other rehabilitation work in 1974; new pier foundation in 1970s. Sew support beams and posts under floor joists - proposed in 1981. Siting: in open "prairie" meadow within 100' of 3 other homestead buildings.

SIGNIFICANCE

Although less than fifty years, the Roose Cabin is a contributing building in the Roose historic district, which is comprised of three standing structures, sections of fencing, all surrounded by open fields. The district as a whole represents the settlement era and the subsistence lifestyle in the ethnic Scandinavian community at Ozette Lake that was first founded around 1890. Other than the adjoining Ahlstroms homestead, now being fast overgrown by vegetation, the Roose homestead is the last extant amalgam of buildings and associated landscapes at the Ozette Lake ethnic settlement community. The Roose Cabin retains much of its architectural integrity.



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AHLSTROM BARN



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Ahlstrom Barn


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Located about one and one-half miles west of Ozette Lake and adjoining the Peter Roose homestead, the Ahlstrom homestead of approximately 160 acres, was established almost concurrently with the Roose homestead, around 1908. These two Ozette Lake settlers were among the second wave of Scandinavian pioneer settlers to arrive at Ozette Lake. (The first contingent of settlers established homesteads in the Ozette Lake area between the late 1880s and 1897, when the area came under Federal jurisdiction, which discouraged further settlement.) Following Ahlstrom's arrival on land now known as Ahlstrom's Prairie, he erected two barns, a two-story house, a shed, a chicken house and fences, and pursued a subsistence agrarian lifestyle typical of most of the early pioneer settlers in the Ozette Lake area. Ahlstrom remained on his homestead for fifty-six years. In 1948 the Seattle Times newspaper published an article about Lars Ahlstrom entitled "The Man Farthest West in Continental U.S." Ahlstrom abandoned his homestead in 1958 when he became ill. In 1973 one Ahlstrom structure, presumably a barn, burned to the ground. Today only a second barn and the cabin remain.

Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 14' x 20'; 1 story; pole and sawn timber wall construction sided with vertical, rough sawn boards; board and batten siding on some walls; gable roof with cedar shakes; exposed rafters; no foundation; window openings on west wall; door openings on north and south walls. Alterations: none known.

Setting: at the south edge of Ahlstrom's Prairie; approx. 300' north of trail; site becoming overgrown with trees and salal.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Ahlstrom Barn is ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The structure is possibly less than fifty years old, since fire in the late 1920s or early 1930s reportedly destroyed all of the Ahlstrom buildings. Additionally, there is a great loss of integrity of the homestead site since the two remaining buildings and the surrounding agricultural fields are nearly obliterated by the encroachment of native vegetation. Neither the barn nor the potential rural historic district retains substantial integrity of design, setting, feeling, and association due to the obliteration by vegetation and the deterioration of the barn structure.



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ROOSE ROOT HOUSE



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Roose Root House


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed by Scandinavian settler Peter Roose, this Root House was probably built in the 1920s. Although an exact construction date has not been determined, it is very likely that the structure dates from the 1920s or earlier, since Roose settled on what is now known as Roose's Prairie before 1910 and immediately began pursuing a subsistence agrarian lifestyle. Both Peter Roose and his neighbor to the south, Lars Ahlstrom, cultivated small plots of land and grew vegetables and fruits such as potatoes, carrots, onions, rutabagas, strawberries, and raspberries. The root house was probably used for the storage of perishable garden produce. The Root House is one of a number of buildings constructed on the Roose homestead: the others include a log cabin later followed by a frame house, a barn, a sheep barn, a shed, and a sawmill. Fences were erected to delineate sections of open field used for grazing sheep. The Root House is one of only three buildings that remain standing on the Roose homestead.

Rectangular in shape; measures 9'6" x 108"; 1 story; wood-frame, double-wall construction; horizontal clapboards on exterior walls; clapboards extend beyond corners of building; gable roof with cedar shakes, exposed rafters; no foundation; no window openings; wood door on west elevation. Alterations: wood skirting on lower portion of walls recently added(?).

Setting: located at the edge of a meadow approximately 50' from Roose's Cabin.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Root House contributes to the historical significance and the physical integrity of the Peter Roose rural historic district. The collection of three extant buildings, sections of fencing, and open fields surrounding these cultural features, is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The district as a whole represents the settlement era and the subsistence lifestyle in the ethnic Scandinavian community at Ozette Lake that was first founded around 1890. Other than the adjoining Ahlstrom's homestead, now being fast reclaimed by native vegetation, the Roose homestead is the last extant amalgam of buildings and associated features at the Ozette Lake ethnic community. The district retains a considerable degree of integrity of location, design, materials, setting, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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ROOSE SHEEP BARN



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Roose Sheep Barn


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Homestead settler Peter Roose constructed the Sheep Barn probably in the 1920s, or before. Although an exact construction date has not been determined, it is very likely that the structure dates from the 1920s, since Roose settled before 1910 on what is now known as Roose's Prairie and immediately began pursuing a subsistence agrarian lifestyle. Peter Roose, along with cultivating fruits and vegetables for personal consumption, raised sheep for the commercial marketing of their wool. The Sheep Barn was at one time joined by other structures, including a log cabin later replaced by a frame house, a second barn, a root house, a shed, and a sawmill. Three buildings and sections of fencing that delineate areas of open field remain intact. Before 1974 a north-projecting portion of the Sheep Barn collapsed, and was later filled in with boards to seal out the weather.

Rectangular in shape; measures 20'4" x 16'; 1 story; wood-frame (sawn timber) wall construction, sheathed with vertical wood boards; gable roof with cedar shakes; exposed rafters and purlins; no foundation; 2 window openings on rear elevation; wide door opening on main facade. Alterations: removal of a portion of structure attached to the west, side elevation.

Setting: lower portion of a prairie: approx. 100' from Roose1s Cabin.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Sheep Barn contributes to the historical significance, and the physical integrity of the Peter Roose rural historic district. The collection of three extant buildings, sections of fencing and areas of open fields surrounding these cultural features, are eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The district as a whole represents the settlement era and the subsistence lifestyle in the ethnic Scandinavian community at Ozette Lake, that was first found around 1890. Other than the adjoining Ahlstrom's homestead, now being fast reclaimed by native vegetation, the Roose homestead is the last extant amalgam of buildings and associated cultural landscapes at the Ozette Lake ethnic community. The district retains a considerable degree of integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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TOLEAK SHELTER



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TOLEAK SHELTER - 1997
Toleak Shelter - 1997
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net





Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Toleak Shelter is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places at this time. It is not fifty years old.

The Toleak Shelter is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places at this time. It is not fifty years old. The shelter may be eligible when it reaches fifty years old. The completion of the Toleak Shelter ended a twelve year work effort in Olympic National Park by the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC). The Toleak Shelter was constructed in 1971 by the YCC. The work was led by Ernie Vail, the Olympic National Park trails foreman. The Toleak Shelter is unique in that it is an enclosed A-frame structure. All other shelters in the park are three sided, open front structures.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1971
AD
1971
AD
Ernie Vail National Park Service
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
No Records


Short Physical Description:

Toleak Point Shelter is an enclosed A-frame structure. The base of the structure is 10 wide by approximately 12 long. The roof is covered with cedar shakes and the siding consists of vertical cedar siding.

Long Physical Description:

Toleak Point Shelter is an enclosed A-frame structure. The base of the structure is 10 wide by approximately 12 long. The roof is covered with cedar shakes and the siding consists of vertical cedar siding. The shelter originally included an open masonry fireplace hearth and a hood that did not work well. In 1972, the YCC, under the direction of Russ Dalton, trail crew member, removed the fireplace hood and installed a wood stove.

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OZETTE COAST GUARD STATION



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Photos furnished by Karen

Circa 1943

Cabin Watch Station

Cabin Watch Station - 1943

JOHN BILL WALTER

John, Bill and Walter - 1943

WALTER

Walter - 1943

WALTER BRUCE ROBERT PAUL

Walter, Bruce, Robert and Paul - 1943

WALTER AND CHUCK WITH MUSKY

Walter and Chuck with Musky - 1943

WALTER AND CHUCK WITH MUSKY

Walter and Chuck with Musky - 1943

WALTER AND COAST GUARD PATROL

Walter and Coast Guard Patrol - 1943

WALTER JOHN AND BOAT

Walter, John and Boat - 1943

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