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HURRICANE AREA



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DEER PARK RANGER STATION spacer DEER PARK SHELTER - I spacer DEER PARK SHELTER - II spacer GRAY WOLF SHELTER


KLAHHANE CLUB HOUSE spacer SKOOKUM MINING CLAIM CABIN spacer THREE FORKS SHLETER



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DEER PARK SHELTER - 1



Click on photo to enlarge




Deer Park Shelter - 2006 spacer Deer Park Shelter

Photo one is from RodF on NWHikers.net and taken in 2006.
Photo two is from HJT on NWHikers.net.

Deer Park Shelter 1


From Historic Resource Study 1983 Olympic National Park
By Gail E. H. Evans and T. Allan Comp

Constructed around 1930 by the U.S. Forest Service, this Deer Park Shelter was one of dozens of trail shelters erected in the 1930s on the Olympic Peninsula. The U.S. Forest Service, who had jurisdiction over much of the area now included in Olympic National Park from 1905 to 1938, initiated shelter construction in the late 1920s and the 1930s. Shelter construction coincided with a period of active trail construction by the Forest Service. Shelters were at first intended for use by crews building and maintaining trails and laying telephone lines for fire protection purposes. As part of the Forest Service's multiple land use management policy, trails and shelters served to encourage backcountry recreational use in the interior Olympics. In the 1930s, CCC corpsmen under the supervision of the Forest Service, accelerated shelter and trail construction activity. By the late 1930s, nearly 90 shelters stood on the Olympic Peninsula. The greatest abundance of shelters built in the 1930s occurred on the north and east facing slopes of the Olympic Range. During this initial period of construction, shelters were built primarily in lowland valleys along major rivers and creeks, and sited at locations where the fishing and scenery was attractive. In some instances (particularly along the Bogachlel River), shelters supplanted or augmented existing guard stations, or were constructed at existing popular hunting or fishing "camps" (especially along the Elwha River). Typically, shelters stood from three to five miles apart on established trails. Architecturally, these Forest Service-built shelters dating from the 1930s were made from local materials obtained from the building site, were constructed of peeled poles, or split-cedar lumber, sheathed with cedar shakes and were capped with gable, or shed, cedar-shake roofs. Shelters were three-sided, and roomy enough to provide several people protection from the inclement weather typical on the peninsula. Significant numbers of the late 1920s and 1930s Forest Service-type shelters were taken down in the mid 1970s, and in 1984 fewer than twenty remain standing. Square in shape; measures 14' x 14'; 1 story; pole frame wall construction with board and batten siding; gable roof with cedar shakes; exposed pole rafters and purlins; stone foundation piers; open on one side; wood flooring. Alterations: original shake siding replaced in 1974; wood flooring probably constructed around same time. Siting: Deer Park Campground amidst a grove of spruce trees; picnic table and fire circle nearby.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Deer Park Shelter fl is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Although constructed during a historically significant period of shelter construction during the U.S. Forest Service's administration of the interior Olympic Peninsula, this shelter has undergone substantial alteration through maintenance performed by work crews since the 1950s. Original cedar shake walls have been resided with board and batten siding and a wood floor constructed. As a result, there is substantial loss of integrity of materials and workmanship.



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DEER PARK SHELTER - 2



Click on photo to enlarge




Deer Park Shelter - 2006 spacer Deer Park Shelter

Photo one is from RodF on NWHikers.net and taken in 2006.
Photo two is from HJT on NWHikers.net.

Deer Park Shelter 2


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed around 1930 by the U.S. Forest Service, this Deer Park Shelter was one of dozens of trail shelters erected in the 1930s on the Olympic Peninsula. The U.S. Forest Service, who had jurisdiction over much of the area now included in Olympic National Park from 1905 to 1933, initiated shelter construction in the late 1920s and the 1930s. Shelter construction coincided with a period of active trail construction by the Forest Service. Shelters were at first intended for use by crews building and maintaining trails and laying telephone lines for fire protection purposes. As part of the Forest Service's multiple land use management policy, trails and shelters served to encourage backcountry recreational use in the interior Olympics. In the 1930s, CCC corpsmen under the supervision of the Forest Service, accelerated shelter and trail construction activity. By the late 1930s nearly 90 shelters stood on the Olympic Peninsula. The greatest abundance of shelters built in the 1930s occurred on the north and east facing slopes of the Olympic Range. During this initial period of construction, shelters were built primarily in lowland valleys along major rivers and creeks, and sited at locations where the fishing and scenery was attractive. In some instances (particularly along the Bogachlel River), shelters supplanted or augmented existing ranger or guard stations, or were constructed at existing popular hunting or fishing "camps" (especially along the Elwha River). Typically, shelters stood from three to five miles apart on established trails. Architecturally, these Forest Service-built shelters dating from the 1930s were made from local materials obtained from the building site, were constructed of peeled-pole or split-cedar lumbers sheathed with cedar shakes, and were capped with gable or shed, cedar shake roofs. Shelters were three-sided, and roomy enough to provide several people protection from the inclement weather typical on the peninsula. Significant numbers of the late 1920s and 1930s Forest Service type shelters were taken down in the mid 1970s, and in 1984 fewer than twenty remain standing. Square in shape; measures 14' x 14'; 1 story; pole frame wall construction with board and batten siding; gable roof with cedar shakes; exposed pole rafters and purlins; stone foundation piers; open on one side; wood flooring. Alterations: original shake siding replaced with board and batten in 1974; wood floor probably constructed around same time. Siting: Deer Park Campground amidst grove of spruce trees; picnic tables and fire circles nearby.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Deer Park. Shelter 2 is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Although constructed during a historically significant period of shelter construction during the U.S. Forest Service's administration of the interior Olympic Peninsula, this shelter has undergone substantial alteration through maintenance performed by work crews since the 1950s. Original cedar shake walls have been resided with board and batten siding, and a wood floor constructed. As a result, there is substantial loss of integrity of materials and workmanship.



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GRAYWOLF FALLS SHELTER



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Graywolf Falls Shelter

Graywolf Falls Shelter - 1990 spacer spacer Shelter Remains - 2008

Upper Graywolf Shelter as of 1990 and 2000 - Recent photos from NWHikers.net by Don Abbott
Destroyed by arson in 2006. Third photo by HJT from NWHikers.net showing remains in 2008.

Gray Wolf Shelter - 1990 spacer Gray Wolf Shelter - 2000

Gray Wolf Shelter - 1990 and 2000
Photos one and two by RodF on NWHikers.net

Gray Wolf Bridge - 1994 spacer Gray Wolf Bridge - 1994 spacer Gray Wolf Bridge - 1994 spacer

Gray Wolf Bridge near shelter
Photos one to three by RodF on NWHikers.net - Taken in 1994

From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed around 1930, the Graywolf Falls Shelter was one of dozens of trail shelters erected by the U.S. Forest Service in the 1930s on the Olympic Peninsula. The U.S. Forest Service, which had jurisdiction over much of the area now included in Olympic National Park from 1905 to 193&, initiated shelter construction in the late 1920s and the 1930s. Shelter construction coincided with a period of active trail construction by the Forest Service. Shelters were at first intended for use by crews building and maintaining trails and laying telephone lines for fire protection purposes. As part of the Forest Service's multiple land use management policy, trails and shelters served to encourage backcountry recreational use in the interior Olympics. In the 1930s, CCC corpsmen under the supervision of the Forest Service, accelerated shelter and trail construction activity. By the late 1930s nearly 90 shelters stood on the Olympic Peninsula. The greatest abundance of shelters built in the 1930s occurred on the north and east facing slopes of the Olympic Range. During this initial period of construction, shelters were built primarily in lowland valleys along major rivers and creeks, and sited at locations where the fishing and scenery was attractive. In some instances (particularly along the Bogachlel River), shelters supplanted or augmented existing ranger or guard stations, or were constructed at existing popular hunting or fishing "camps" (especially along the Elwha River). Typically, shelters stood from three to five miles apart on established trails. Architecturally, these Forest Service-built shelters dating from the 1930s were made from local materials obtained from the building site, were constructed of peeled-pole or split-cedar lumbers sheathed with cedar shakes, and were capped with gable or shed, cedar shake roofs. Shelters were three-sided, and roomy enough to provide several people protection from the inclement weather typical on the peninsula. Significant numbers of the late 1920s and 1930s Forest Service-type shelters were taken down in the mid 1970s, and in 1984 fewer than twenty remain standing. Square in shape; measures 14' x 14'; 1 story; pole wall construction with board and batten siding; modified gable roof with cedar shakes; pole rafters; split cedar purlins; stone foundation; no doors or windows; open on one side; wood flooring. Alterations: wood shake exterior walls replaced with vertical board and batten siding 1952; wood flooring recent. Siting; located on knoll in small clearing approx. 20' from Graywolf River.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Graywolf Falls Shelter is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Although constructed during a historically significant period of shelter construction during the U.S. Forest Service's administration of the interior Olympic Peninsula, this shelter has undergone substantial alteration through maintenance performed by work crews since the 1950s. Original cedar shake walls have been resided with board and batten siding, and wood flooring installed. As a result, there is substantial loss of integrity of materials and workmanship.



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KLAHHANE CLUBHOUSE



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Klahhane Clubhouse



From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Situated near the base of Mount Angeles and not far from the shores of Lake Dawn, the Klahhane Clubhouse was built around 1932 under the direction and supervision of Oscar Nelson, ion land purchased by E. B. Webster, early president-of the Klahhane Club. The Lake Dawn (Heart 0' the Hills) site was the third location of this north Olympic Peninsula hiking club clubhouse. Soon after the formation of the Klahhane Club in 1914, the group occupied an abandoned two-story log house built by Louis Williams as summer retreat, on a bench at the foot of Mount Angeles. After the Williams cabin burned in the early 1920s, the hiking club moved their meeting place to Lake Crescent, where they took over buildings at the north shore resort of Qui Si Sana. In the early 1930s the Klahhanes moved back to the foot of Mount Angeles, constructing the present clubhouse. E. B. Webster, early president and influential member of the organization, developed an extensive garden featuring a variety of native plants and an aviary on the grounds of the new clubhouse. (Webster, in addition, was editor of the principal newspaper and a prominent member of the Port Angeles community.) In the mid 1930s, club members added a kitchen to the building. In 1955 a fireplace and chimney were constructed, and in 1962 the club constructed a woodshed. In addition to serving as a meeting place, the Klahhane Clubhouse functioned as a museum for many years, housing plant and animal specimens and indian and historic artifacts. When the 20,600-acre Morse Creek watershed was added to Olympic National Park in 1943, a corner of the Klahhane Clubhouse was included. The Klahhane Club is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, continuously functioning hiking clubs on the Olympic Peninsula. Rectangular/in shape; measures 28'x 20'; 1 story; log wall construction sheathed with split cedar shakes; gable ends have vertical board with cedar bark covering; gable roof with split cedar shakes; smaller gable extension on south elevation measures 13' x 15'; exposed pole rafters; concrete block foundation; multi-light and single-pane, fixed-sash windows; gable roof porch on north elevation measures 7' x 15'; all wood interior. Alterations: new foundation, sills, and floor Joists and chimney constructed in mid 1950s; wood shed constructed in 1962. Siting: approx. 4 yards from shore of Lake Dawn on gravel road.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Klahhane Clubhouse is ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The club is noted for leading early recreational hiking parties into the Olympic Mountains, and has on several occasions, supported conservation issues effecting the Olympics. The Klahhane Clubhouse and surrounding grounds have lost considerable integrity over the years as a result of neglect (in the case of the Webster Gardens). Improvements made to the building that is unsympathetic to the original structure. The present structure is neither representative of a particular type, design of architecture, nor does it exhibit outstanding craftsmanship.



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SKOOKUM MINING CLAIM CABIN



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Skookum Mining Claim Cabin


Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_1 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_2 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_3 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_4

Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_5 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_6 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_7 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_8

Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_9 Skookum Mining Claim Cabin_10

The recent colored photos were furnished by Nathan (quaktheduck) and Gina (acovenantinblood) from a recent trip they took to the area.

Thank you for the photos.


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Miners prospecting for manganese in the Little River drainage in the late 1930s and 1940s reportedly constructed the Skookum Mining Claim Cabin. This cabin represents a period of active prospecting that took place in the manganese-rich Little River (mining) District during the years between the world wars. In 1934, twenty-six claims were reported in the district. In addition to Skookum, claims known as Broken Shovel, Ella, F & L, Chappie Group, Sunset and at Whistler Flat were reported in 1934. Typical of many mining claims in the Olympics, most of those in the Little River District lay above 4,200, and access was often limited to only trails. Although World War 11's heavy demands for steel (of which manganese was a component) raised local interest in a mine-to-market road in the Little River District, this was never constructed. Gradually, mining interest and activity in this district, as in others throughout the Olympics, subsided and mining ditches, tunnels, tailings, claim markers and associated mining structures succumbed to the muting effect of erosion and vegetative re-growth. Skookum is the last standing mining cabin in the park. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 12' x 20'; 1 story; un-peeled log wall construction (horizontal); medium pitch gable roof sheathed with split shakes; split shakes in gable ends; stone foundation (where it exists); bands of 4-light fixed pane windows with milled wood framing; interior: exposed peeled purlins and rafters; split shake and milled plank floor; 6 wall bunkbeds and wall shelving. Siting: located a narrow terrace on hillside; densely wooded.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Skookum Mining Claim Cabin is ineligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Although it is the only extant building in Olympic National Park that represents the mining activity that occurred sporadically from the late 1880s until the creation of the park (and later in some districts), the cabin's loss of integrity due to deterioration has significantly eroded the structure's sense of time and place. Architecturally, the cabin no longer has integrity of materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. Additionally, evidence exists that subsequent couplers of the cabin may have made minor alterations to the structure.



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THREE FORKS SHELTER



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Three Forks Shelter - 1992 - 2005 spacer Three Forks Shelter - 1994 spacer Three Forks Shelter

Photo one is Three Forks Shelter between 1992 - 2005 - Recent photo from NWHikers.net by HJT

Photo two is Three Forks Shelter in 1994 - Recent photo from NWHikers.net by RodF

Photo three is Three Forks Shelter - Recent photo from NWHikers.net by HJT

Three Forks Shelter


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed in a narrow wooded valley near the confluence of Grand and Cameron Creeks, Three Forks Shelter was one of dozens of shelter structures erected by the U.S. Forest Service in the early 1930s. An early 1930s map of the Olympic Peninsula indicates that the site of this shelter was an already established "camp" for recreational users of the Olympic Mountains. The U.S. Forest Service, who had jurisdiction over much of the area now included in Olympic National Park from 1905 to 1933, initiated shelter construction in the late 1920s and the 1930s. Shelter construction coincided with a period of active trail construction by the Forest Service. Shelters were at first intended for use by crews building and maintaining trails and laying telephone lines for fire protection purposes. As part of the Forest Service's multiple land use management policy, trails and shelters served to encourage backcountry recreational use in the interior Olympics. In the 1930s, CCC corpsmen under the supervision of the Forest Service, accelerated shelter and trail construction activity. By the late 1930s nearly 90 shelters stood on the Olympic Peninsula. The greatest abundance of shelters built in the 1930s occurred on the north and east facing slopes of the Olympic Range. During this initial period of construction, shelters were built primarily in lowland valleys along major rivers and creeks, and sited at locations where the fishing and scenery was attractive. In some instances (particularly along the Bogachlel River), shelters supplanted or augmented existing ranger or guard stations, or were constructed at existing popular hunting or fishing "camps" (especially along the Elwha River). Typically, shelters stood from three to five miles apart on established trails. Architecturally, these Forest Service-built shelters dating from the 1930s were made from local materials obtained from the building site, were constructed of peeled-pole or split-cedar lumbers sheathed with cedar shakes, and were capped with gable or shed, cedar shake roofs. Shelters were three-sided, and roomy enough to provide several people protection from the inclement weather typical on the peninsula. Significant numbers of the late 1920s and 1930s Forest Service-type shelters were taken down in the mid 1970s, and in 1984 fewer than twenty remain standing. Square in shape; measures 14' x 14'; 1 story; pole wall construction with cedar shake sheathing; modified gable roof with cedar shakes; exposed pole rafters and split purlins; stone and wood foundation; 1 window opening on west wall; open on south side; bunk beds on side walls; dirt floor. Alterations: replacement shakes on portion of rear wall. Siting: located in small, flat opening at edge of hemlock and cedar forest approx. 30' from Grand Creek; outhouse approx. is 20' from rear of shelter.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Three Forks Shelter is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Historically, this shelter was one of dozens of shelter structures constructed by the U.S. Forest Service during the late 1920s and the 1930s on the Olympic Peninsula. It represents a period in Forest Service management history when policy concerns and planning focused heavily on fire protection through trail, lockout and shelter construction, and on encouraging recreational use in the wilderness back country. Unlike many 1930s' Forest Service shelters on the Olympic Peninsula that have been destroyed or succumbed to severe deterioration or vandalism. Three Forks Shelter retains much of its fabric that is original or in kind materials have replaced the original. Consequently, it possesses integrity of design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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DEER PARK RANGER STATION



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Deer Park Ranger Station

Deer Park Ranger Station spacer Deer Park Ranger Station

Deer Park Ranger Station and Station Window View. Photo by Hesmeister in 2011 from NWHikers.net


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed around 1936, the Crew House at Deer Park was originally part of the Deer Park winter sports area development. In its early years of establishment, a local ski club probably leased the building from the National Forest Service for use as a bunkhouse. In the late 1930s, it also served as quarters for a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) work crew. The CCC was largely responsible for construction of the Deer Park Road and development work completed at the Deer Park recreation area. The CCC may have contributed to the construction of the Crew House under Forest Service direction. Around 1940, the CCC repaired buildings at Deer Park for use as a CCC side camp. In 1946, more repair work was done on this and other structures at Deer Park. In the 1950s major alteration to the building occurred: new siding replaced existing wall covering, and possibly a new roof and foundation were constructed. The Crew House was the focus of repair and rehabilitation work by the Student Conservation Corps in 1974.

Rectangular in shape; measures 20' x 40'; 1 story; wood-frame wall construction sheathed with board and batten siding; gable roof with wood shingles; poured concrete foundation; multi-light projected casement and fixed sash windows; irregular fenestration; double-leaf wood door on main facade. Alterations: exterior sheathing. Horizontal boards up until 1950s; building enlarged in 1974 by SCA group.

Setting: located on small projecting shoulder of Blue Mt. amidst small grove of evergreen trees.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Deer Park Crew House is ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Extensive recent alterations have substantially diminished its integrity of design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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