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OLYMPUS RANGER STATION



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Constructed of vertical peeled logs and cedar shakes, the Hoh Ranger Station, in the early 1920s, served as a stopping place for recreational hikers and sports enthusiasts. The National Forest Service encouraged recreational use of both the Forest and the Monument. (Photo by A. Curtis, courtesy of Washington State Historical Society)


Olympus Ranger Station spacer Olympus Ranger Station Interior spacer Olympus Ranger Station Interior

Olympus Ranger Station - 1999. Photo by RodF from NWHikers.net

Olympus Ranger Station spacer Olympus Ranger Station


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

The National Park Service built Olympus Ranger Station in 1935, two years after jurisdiction of Mount Olympus National Monument was transferred from the Forest Service to the Park Service. The U.S. Forest Service constructed an earlier Olympus Guard Station, possibly as early as the 1910s or early 1920s. This small building of vertical board or shake siding was possibly added on to by extending the building to the rear. The new Olympus Ranger Station constructed by the Park Service was set in an open meadow where packhorses grazed, that was located a short distance down river from the old Olympus Guard Station. Eventually, the old guard station was removed. The new Olympus Ranger Station was one of only three ranger stations in Mount Olympus National Monument after the Park Service gained jurisdiction of the monument in 1933. (The others were the Elkhorn and Dosemeadows Ranger stations.) In 1984, it is probable that the Olympus Ranger Station is the oldest standing administrative structure in Olympic National Park built by the National Park Service. The National Park Service actively participated in land management on the Olympic Peninsula beginning in 1938 with the creation of the 682,000-acre Olympic National Park. Subsequent land acquisitions by the National Park Service in 1940, 1943, and 1953, expanded the size of the initial land-locked interior core of the park, and added nearly the entire length of the Queets River and a narrow strip along the Pacific Coast. Much of the new Olympic National Park was carved from land previously administered by the U.S. Forest Service. The shift in land management philosophy and administrative policies from the Forest Service to the Park Service was reflected in the quantity, location, and design of these respective agencies's administrative structures. In 1938, the Park Service inherited scores of Forest Service built ranger and guard stations standing inside the new park boundaries. Many were taken over and utilized; others were demolished over time. In a few instances the Park Service erected new administrative structures at sites with existing but deteriorating buildings, or established new administrative sites. Early in the park's history, in addition to a cadre of new buildings that formed the Park Service headquarters in Port Angeles, the Park Service constructed four new ranger station buildings, and one already-existing group of buildings was converted to a park ranger station. Rectangular in shape; measures 16' x 24' (main block), 9' x 6' porch on front elevation; 1 1/2 stories; horizontal, hewn, square log wall construction with dovetail corner joints; gable roof on main block and porch with wood shakes; hewn, log rafters; post and pier foundation; single-light windows; wood door with Z bracing; Interior wood flooring; built-in cabinets. Alterations; 4-llght, double sliding windows replaced with single fixed pane. Siting; at edge of large meadow, approx. 30' from shelter.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Olympus Ranger Station is presently eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The building is currently fifty years old. Historically, the building is of great significance since it is believed to be the oldest extant Park Service-built administrative structure now in Olympic National Park. Architecturally, it is a good representative example of Rustic Style architecture, a style initiated by the Park Service in the 1910s. The building and the site have been only minimally altered; thus the structure possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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OWL MOUNTAIN LOOKOUT



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Owl Mountain Lookout


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Owl Mountain Lookout, located on the boundary between Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest, was built as an Aircraft Warning Service (AWS) lookout around 1942 expressly for the purpose of spotting enemy aircraft during World War II. Under the direction of the U.S. Army, the AWS was initiated in 1942 when the threat of enemy air attack on the West Coast loomed large in the minds of many military strategists. Small ground based observation posts were activated throughout the Pacific Northwest beginning that summer and continuing through the winter of 1942-1943. With the U.S. Forest Service as coordinating agency for the establishment of AWS observation posts, thirteen sites within the present boundary of Olympic National Park, in addition to the Owl Mountain site, were established as AWS lockouts. Only three of these lookouts, Dodger Point and Pyramid Peak, plus Owl Mountain, remain standing partially) or totally, within the park. Charlie Lewis, long time pioneer settler on the Hoh River, is responsible for the construction of Owl Mountain Lockout. This structure is not maintained and in deteriorated condition. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 13* x 17*; 1 1/2 stories; split cedar pole wall construction with shake siding, gable roof with wood shakes, no eaves; log sills on stone foundation; projected, multi-light casement windows; vertical wood door with bracing; floor boards are milled; loft space; built-in bunk. Alterations: none apparent. Siting: In low growth and trees; no trail.

SIGNIFICANCE

In 1984 Owl Mountain AWS Lockout is not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places since the building is less than fifty years old. Historically, the Owl Mountain Lookout is significant for its role in the air defense efforts on the West Coast of the U.S. during World War II. Although the structure suffers from deterioration due to lack of maintenance, it stands as one of the few extant AWS lockouts in western Washington. Owl Mountain Lockout may be eligible for the National Register in 1994.



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TWENTY ONE MILE SHELTER



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Twenty One Mile Shelter spacer Twenty One Mile Shelter spacer Twenty One Mile Shelter - 1999

21 Mile Shelter as of pre-1989 and 1999 - Photo 3 from NWHikers.net by Don Abbott

From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

The Twenty-one Mile Shelter is one of four extant shelter structures along the Bogachlel River on the western slope of the Olympic Range. Constructed around 1931, it was among the earliest, still standing shelters, built by the Forest Service on the Olympic Peninsula. Peter Brandeberry, early Hoh, and later Bogachlel River settler, was seasonally employed by the Forest Service, and according to informant Jack Nattinger, may be the builder of all four Bogachlel shelters. Indeed, all four shelters share a somewhat unusual architectural feature: the major structural supports are of split cedar rather than peeled poles. Many Bogachlel River shelters were erected at or near back country guard stations: the Indian Creek Shelter stood near Indian Creek Guard Station; Flapjack Shelter stood near the Flapjack Guard Station (both shelters non extant); and the Hyak Shelter stood near the Hyak Guard Station. The U.S. Forest Service, who had jurisdiction over much of the area now included in Olympic National Park from 1905 to 1933, initiated shelter construction in the late 1920s and the 1930s. Shelter construction coincided with a period of active trail construction by the Forest Service. Shelters were at first intended for use by crews building and maintaining trails and laying telephone lines for fire protection purposes. As part of the Forest Service's multiple land use management policy, trails and shelters served to encourage backcountry recreational use in the interior Olympics. In the 1930s, CCC corpsmen under the supervision of the Forest Service, accelerated shelter and trail construction activity. By the late 1930s nearly 90 shelters stood on the Olympic Peninsula. The greatest abundance of shelters built in the 1930s occurred on the north and east facing slopes of the Olympic Range. During this period of construction, shelters were built primarily in lowland valleys along major rivers and creeks, and sited at locations where the fishing and scenery was attractive. In some instances (particularly along the Bogachlel River), shelters supplanted or augmented existing ranger or guard stations, or were constructed at existing popular hunting or fishing "camps" (especially along the Elwha River). Typically, shelters stood from three to five miles apart on established trails. Architecturally, these Forest Service-built shelters dating from the 1930s were made from local materials obtained from the building site, were constructed of peeled-pole or split-cedar lumber sheathed with cedar shakes, and was capped with gable or shed, cedar shake roofs. Shelters were three-sided, and roomy enough to provide several people protection from the inclement weather typical on the peninsula. Significant numbers of the late 1920s and 1930s Forest Service-type shelters were taken down in the mid 1970s, and in 1984 fewer than twenty remain standing. Rectangular in shape; measures 14' x 14'; 1-story; peeled-pole wall construction with cedar shakes; open on one side; portions of side walls open; 2-sided; approx. 4' high vertical shake "curtain" at front opening of shelter; modified gable roof with cedar shakes; rough split, exposed cedar rafters and purlins; staked, stone foundation; no window openings; single beds along each side wall; outhouse approx. 35' from shelter. Alterations: construction of shake "curtain"; possible resheathing of roof and portion of exterior walls. Siting: located on wooded hillside near the confluence of a small creek and the North Fork of the Bogachlel River.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Twenty-one Mile Shelter, along with the three other extant shelters on the Bogachlel River, is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. This structure represents an important historical era in the management of the Olympic Peninsula public lands by the Forest Service, whose primary concerns in the 1920s and 1930s centered on fire protection for the extensive timber stands, and recreational development. This building is typical of the architectural type of shelter built by the Forest Service in the 1930s. Located approx. 5 miles distant from a neighboring shelter (or shelters), this shelter and its companions maintain the spatial distribution of shelters built by the Forest Service in the 1930s along lowland valleys of the interior mountains. This unbroken chain of shelters along the Bogachlel River, is not duplicated anywhere else on the peninsula in 1980. Few, if any, alterations have been made to the structure, thus it possesses integrity of design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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BLUE GLACIER SHELTER - 1



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BLUE GLACIER SHELTER - 1 spacer BLUE GLACIER SHELTER - 1 - 1995
Blue Glacier Shelter - 1 - 1995
Posted by RodF on NWHikers.net
Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Blue Glacier Shelter #1 is individually eligible, along with the other two shelters of this design, for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

These shelters represent a specific management period in the Park history that sought to provide trail shelters at popular backcountry locations. At the same time, the design sought to be more durable and require less maintenance, more compact in character for small hiking parties, and less visible on the landscape. Blue Glacier Shelter #2 is one of the few remaining shelters to reflect a policy to develop a new generation of recreational shelters.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1949
AD
1949
AD
National Park Service
Other
2. 
Preserved
2009
AD


OLYM/NPS
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Blue Glacier Shelter #1 is a three-sided solid log structure measuring roughly 12 x 12.

Long Physical Description:

The wall and sill logs measured 10 in diameter and rested on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 4 feet in height, while the front opening was six feet. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 6 diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof beam. Four 5rafters spanned front to back along the slope of the roof. Eight 3 shake nailer poles crossed the rafters and were covered with 20 long hand-split cedar shakes.



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BLUE GLACIER SHELTER - 2



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Blue Glacier Shelter - 2 spacer GLACIER MEADOWS SHELTER - 1995
Glacier Meadows Shelter - 1995
Posted by RodF on NWHikers.net


Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Blue Glacier Shelter #2 is individually eligible, along with the other two shelters of this design, for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

These shelters represent a specific management period in the Park history that sought to provide trail shelters at popular backcountry locations. At the same time, the design sought to be more durable and require less maintenance, more compact in character for small hiking parties, and less visible on the landscape. Blue Glacier Shelter #2 is one of the few remaining shelters to reflect a policy to develop a new generation of recreational shelters.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1950
AD
1950
AD
National Park Service
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Blue Glacier Shelter #2 is a three-sided solid log structure measuring roughly 12 x 12.

Long Physical Description:

The wall and sill logs measured 10 in diameter and rested on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 4 feet in height, while the front opening was six feet. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 6 diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof beam. Four 5rafters spanned front to back along the slope of the roof. Eight 3 shake nailer poles crossed the rafters and were covered with 20 long hand-split cedar shakes.



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ELK LAKE SHELTER



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Elk Lake Shelter spacer Elk Lake Shelter
Elk Lake Shelter
1989
Posted by RodF on NWHikers.net
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Elk Lake Shelter
2007
Posted by Gracerann on NWHikers.net


Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Elk Lake Shelter is individually eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

It is one of only five remaining shelters within Olympic National Park representing the final program of shelter construction. Elk Lake shelter exemplifies the continuing National Park Service commitment to providing recreational trailside shelters at popular backcountry locations. The structure retains integrity of design, location, materials, and workmanship.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1963
AD
1963
AD
National Park Service
Other
2. 
Preserved
2009
AD

AD
Olympus NPS
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Elk Lake shelter is a three-sided structure measuring roughly 14 wide by 14 deep.

Long Physical Description:

The wall and sill logs average 11 in diameter and rest on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 6 x2 in height, while the front opening was seven feet, and a ridge of 9. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 10 diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof purlin. Five rows of rafters support nine boards for the shake roof. The gable roof has a long slope to the back, and a short overhang at the front. The shingles are 42 long. The lower sections of the three exterior walls consist of vertical log slabs supported by a round log sill. The log slabs rise to the height of the back wall on all three sides. The gable end walls are then constructed of stacked 6 x 6 sawn timbers, trimmed to form the slope



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HOH RANGER STATION



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Hoh Ranger Shelter


Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Washington SHPO determined that the Hoh Visitor Center was eligible at the state level for the National Register under Criteria A and C, and Special Consideration G (less than 50 years of age). The period of significance is 1954 to 1964

The Hoh Visitor Center is historically significant for its association with the Park Service's Mission 66 which modernized and standardized parks during increased visitation after WWII and created the concept of the visitor center.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1963
AD


Cecil Doty
Architect


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Concrete
2. 
Roof
Shake
3. 
Framing
Wood


Short Physical Description:

The structure is 56' x 32' with a 20'-wide public restroom attached to the back of the south facade. The south facade faces the parking lot, and the east facade looks out into the rain forest. A small utility porch is attached to the west facade, accessing the mechanical equipment room.

Long Physical Description:

Foundation is slab concrete, roof is torch down roofing, walls are board and batten cedar siding with plate glass windows. Slightly sloped shake roof and an exterior stained in neutral shades of bleached wood and green with little accents on trim or sash.



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OLYMPUS GUARD STATION SHELTER



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OLYMPUS GUARD STATION SHELTER

OLYMPUS GUARD STATION SHELTER - 1989
Olympus Guard Station - 1989
Posted by RodF on NWHikers.net




Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

Locally significant under criterion A.

Noteworthy example of a type, style and method of construction incorporating logs, poles, and wood shakes and reflecting U.S. Forest Service design used throughout the national forests of the Pacific Northwest.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1935
AD


USFS
Architect


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Foundation
Stone
2. 
Roof
Wood
3. 
Walls
Wood


Short Physical Description:

Vertical timber walls, double shed roof w/shakes, open front, dirt porch, wood floor, 2 bunks



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SNOW DOME



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SNOW DOME





Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

Snow Dome was determined eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places by the Washington SHPO.

Snow Dome was constructed to support research of Blue Glacier. The research project was funded as part of the International Geophysical Year, 1957, a world-wide effort to fund various scientific research projects. The structure has been used continuously to support the Blue Glacier research. Today data from this research is used in the study of global warming.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1957
AD
1957
AD
ED LaChappell Univeristy of Washington
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Wood
2. 
Roof
Metal


Long Physical Description:

Snow dome is a rectangular structure with a minimally pitched gable roof. It measures approximately 16 wide by 24 long with a 4 by 12 entry vestibule. It is sided in board and batten painted in a brown camouflage pattern. The roof is covered with metal roofing. The building is sited on bedrock at the base of the Blue Glacier.



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