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HALFWAY HOUSE



Click on photo to enlarge




Halfway House


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Herb Crisler built the Halfway House around 1944 shortly after Herb and Lois Crisler spent the winter of 1942-1943 at Hurricane Ridge as Aircraft Warning Service observers where they developed a fondness for skiing. According to author Ruby Hult, the Halfway House and another shelter, the Ski Lair, were used by the Crislers and their friends on winter ski weekends in the Hurricane Ridge area. Halfway House received its name because it was halfway between the Whiskey Bend trailhead on the Elwha River and the summit of Hurricane Ridge. After this experience in the snow, the Crislers made regular winter ski trips to the high Olympics. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 8' x 10'; 1/2 story; peeled log and pole and shake walls, and roof between two living trees; no foundation; open on one side; no windows or doors; dirt floor. Alterations: none known. Siting: In a densely wooded area.

SIGNIFICANCE

Halfway House shelter is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The structure is less than fifty years old. Historically the shelter has no known special significance. Presently it stands in deteriorated condition.



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HOTCAKE SHELTER



Click on photo to enlarge




Hotcake Shelter


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Herb Crisler constructed the first shelter known as "Hotcake" Shelter around the late 1930s to replace an earlier hunting shelter at Windy Hollow, a little up slope from the Hotcake site. The shelter received its name from the tin stove that Crisler packed to the new shelter and used for making pancakes. Hotcake Shelter was one of a series of shelters and caches built by Crisler in the Olympics. Crisler's camp at Hotcake was his photographic headquarters for eight years in the late 1930s and the 1940s. A second shelter was built at Hotcake Camp around 1942. Herb Crisler, a native of Georgia, took up residency on the Olympic Peninsula in 1919 after serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps Spruce Production Division at Pysht, on the peninsula's north coast. During his first years on the peninsula he opened a photo finishing studio and produced postcards of wildlife scenes he photographed in the Olympics. In addition, he engaged in building construction during the cloudy wet months of the year. During the early and mid 1920s, Crisler hiked extensively in the interior Olympics and built cabins and hunting shelters at strategic places in the mountains. After leaving the peninsula briefly in the late 1920s to pursue an unsuccessful career in the commercial airplane business in Seattle, Crisler returned to make his widely publicized cross-Olympic trek without food or hunting weapons. In 1934, Herb Crisler, determined to make a career in wildlife photography, resumed making summer hiking expeditions into the Olympics. In conjunction with his filming exploits, Crisler erected a series of backcountry shelters and caches for storing supplies. After Crisler's marriage to Lois Brown, a University of Washington English teacher, Lois and Herb together hiked and filmed Olympic wildlife. Between 1941 and 1951, Humes Ranch on the Elwha River served as their winter headquarters. One winter, the winter of 1942-43, the Crislers acted as Aircraft Warning Service observers at a lockout on Hurricane Ridge. After this experience in the snow, the Crislers made regular winter ski trips to the high Olympics. During the 1940's, Herb and Lois produced many long and short films depicting the wilderness of the Olympics. Beginning in 1948 the Crislers began traveling nationwide to lecture and show their wildlife films. From 1949 to 1951 Lois Crisler wrote weekly columns for the Port Angeles Evening News in which she described wilderness life in the Olympics. In 1949 Walt Disney agreed to purchase the Crislers' elk film footage to show on his nationally televised program, the "True-Life Adventure" series. The film was released in 1952. For several years following, the Crislers contracted with Disney Studios to film bighorn sheep in Colorado, grizzly bears in Mount McKinley National Park, and wolves and caribou in the Brooks Range. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 10' x 12'; 1 story; log wall construction; shed roof with cedar shakes' rock (7) foundation; open on one side; no windows or doors; dirt floor. Alterations: none known. Siting: approx. 100 feet from smaller Hot Cakes Shelter t2, on hillside in forested area.

SIGNIFICANCE

Hotcake Shelter (No. 1) is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The structure is most likely less than fifty years old. Of all the shelters built by Herb and Lois Crisler for the purpose of shooting wildlife in the Olympic Mountains, Hotcake Shelter (No. 1) is probably the most significant since it served as Crisler's photographic headquarters for several years. The shelter retains much of its physical integrity, and appears to possess integrity of location, design, setting, materials, feeling, and association. In the late 1980s, the building may be deemed eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.



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HUMES CABIN



Click on photo to enlarge




Humes Cabin - 1991 spacer Humes Cabin - 1991 spacer Humes Cabin - 1972 spacer Humes Cabin - 2009

First and second photos by RodF from NWHikers.net taken 1991 of Humes Ranch.
Third photo by RodF from NWHikers.net taken in 1972 of Humes Ranch.
Source is Olympic NP archives
Actually it is from Hal Rothman's newly accepted "American Eden: Administrative History of Olympic NP",
Fourth photo by Goats Gone Wild from NWHikers.net taken in 2009 of Humes Ranch.

Humes Cabin - about 2009 spacer Humes Cabin - about 2009 spacer Humes Cabin - about 2009 spacer Humes Cabin

Photos one and two by Hesmeister from NWHikers.net taken few winters prior to 2011.
Photo three by RodF from NWHikers.net

Humes Cabin


CLICK HERE FOR ELWHA FEUDING HERMITS

From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

After coming to the Elwha River Valley in 1897 from upstate New York, Martin Humes, Will Humes, his brother, and Ward Sanders, his cousin, took up farming in the upper Elwha between Idaho Creek and Lillian River) in the early spring of 1898. By late 1899, Grant Humes was living in the Elwha Valley. Soon after Grant's arrival, he and Brother Will, erected a hewn log cabin on the east bank of the Elwha, the cabin still stands today. Unlike his brothers and cousin, Grant remained on the Elwha River for nearly thirty-four years, becoming widely known on the north Olympic Peninsula for his prowess as a hunter and packer for mountaineering groups, and hunting and fishing parties. In addition to the cabin. Grant Humes erected a barn, a structure adjoining the cabin, and other smaller outbuildings. In 1958, the barn was removed, and in 1970 the building adjoining the cabin was dismantled during an UPS project to rehabilitate the cabin. Rectangular in shape; measures 15' x 18' and 15' x 910"; 1 story; main block-log wall construction with dovetail corner joints; rear attachment-pole wall construction sided with vertical weather boarding; 2 gable roof sections, both sheathed with cedar shakes; hip roof porch extends across main facade; stone foundation; single window opening on west wall; off center door on main (north) facade. Alterations: cabin roof replaced in 1940s and 1958; front porch roof replaced in 1940s, substantially rehabbed. In 1970, rebuilt in 1980, several outbuildings removed in 1950s. Siting: gently sloping, mountain terrace at the edge of clearing approx. 100' from Elwha River flood plain.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Humes Cabin was constructed around 1900 during a period of early homesteading activity in the rain drenched, mountainous interior of the Olympic Peninsula. Over half a century of continuous overland migration and settlement west of the Mississippi River concluded in the isolated, harsh environment now substantially contained in Olympic National Park. The Humes Cabin well represents the efforts and spirit of the American pioneer in settling the "last frontier" of the contiguous United States. Humes Cabin is one of few remaining intact homestead residences on the peninsula and is the oldest extant homestead cabin in Olympic National Park. Grant Humes, occupant of the cabin for nearly 34 years, is credited with participating in the first group ascent of Mt. Olympus. Herb and Lois Crisler, who used the Humes Cabin as their home base in the late 1930s and 1940s, are best known for producing "The Olympic Elk" film, shown nationwide by Walt Disney. Although the structure has incurred some recent exterior alterations resulting from maintenance and rehabilitation efforts, the Humes Cabin still possesses substantial integrity of materials, workmanship and design, and retains a perceptible sense of feeling and association.



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MICHAELS CABIN



Click on photo to enlarge




Michaels Cabin spacer Michaels Cabin - 2002 spacer Michaels Cabin - 2009

First photo by HJT from NWHikers.net taken between 1992 and 2005 of Michaels Cabin.
Second photo by RodF from NWHikers.net taken in 2002 of Michaels Cabin.
Third photo by Goats Gone Wild from NWHikers.net taken in 2009 of Michaels Cabin.

Michaels Cabin spacer Michaels Cabin

Michaels Cabin. Photos one by Hesmeister in 2011 from NWHikers.net
Photo two by RodF from NWHikers.net

Michaels Cabin



From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed around 1937, this cabin was named for E. O. Micheal who was a skilled hunter, trapper, and horse packer in the Elwha River drainage. Micheal arrived in the Elwha probably in the 1920s, and during his residency there' became known as "Cougar Mike" because of the large number of cougars he killed for bounty. E. O. Micheal became well acquainted with Grant Humes and "Doc" Ludden, early settlers and long time residents on the Elwha. Micheal assisted Grant Humes in various building projects, including the construction of the Botten (Wilder) Cabin on the Elwha. After the death of "Doc" Ludden in 1927, E. 0. Micheal occupied the Ludden buildings (situated on a narrow terrace just north of the Micheal Cabin), none of that remain standing. During the 1920s and probably later, E. 0. Micheal ran pack mules for the Forest Service, which then had jurisdiction over the lower Elwha drainage. Later, Micheal worked for the Park Service building trails. According to Jay Gormley, who began working in Olympic National Park in the mid 1930s, Michael's Cabin was constructed by Gormley, Gus Peterson, and E. 0. Micheal and was used by them and others as an occasional stopping place. Micheal probably never occupied his namesake cabin on a permanent basis, but continued to live at the Ludden home. During their first season working in Olympic, in 1958, the Student Conservation Corp completed limited repair work on the cabin. In the mid 1970s, Boy Scout Troop 101 from Port Angeles did some work to stabilize the cabin, including replacing boards on the porch floor and re-shingling the roof of the cabin. Their work is of questionable compatibility to the methods and materials used in constructing the original structure. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 17' x 18' (with 18" porch extending across main facade); 1 story; log wall construction with common corner Joints; wood shake exterior in gable ends; gable roof with shed roof porches on front and rear elevations, sheathed with wood shakes; exposed pole rafters and purlins; post and pier foundation; single window openings on side elevations and framing the central door on the main facade. Alterations: front porch rebuilt; rear porch altered; buildings re-roofed; window openings altered; all in the mid-1970s. Siting: located in small open meadow.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Micheal Cabin is ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The building is less than fifty years old. The building is not associated with persons or historical events that have made a significant contribution to broad patterns in American history, or that are significant in the local area, region; or country. Changes made to the building in the late 1950s and mid 1970s have eroded its architectural integrity. A circa late 1930s photograph of the cabin depicts it as part of the "Doc" Ludden building complex, which no longer stands. The Micheal Cabin site, therefore, has lost considerable integrity of surroundings.



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POACHING CABIN



Click on photo to enlarge




Poaching Cabin


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

This shelter, now known locally as Crisler's "Poaching Cabin," was constructed by Herb Crisler in the mid 1920s during Crisler's early hiking, photographic and hunting expeditions into the Olympics. According to author Ruby Hult, Crisler packed into the shelter a pressure cooker and canning apparatus to use for storing his kill of game. When he gave up hunting around 1930, Crisler left his canning equipment at the shelter. Herb Crisler, a native of Georgia, took up residency on the Olympic Peninsula in 1919 after serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps Spruce Production Division at Pysht, on the peninsula's north coast. During his first years on the peninsula he opened a photo finishing studio and produced postcards of wildlife scenes he photographed in the Olympics. In addition, he engaged in building construction during the cloudy wet months of the year. During the early and mid 1920s, Crisler hiked extensively in the interior Olympics and built cabins and hunting shelters at strategic places in the mountains. After leaving the peninsula briefly in the late 1920s to pursue an unsuccessful career in the commercial airplane business in Seattle, Crisler returned to make his widely publicized cross-Olympic trek without food or hunting weapons. In 1934 Herb Crisler, determined to make a career in wildlife photography, resumed making summer hiking expeditions into the Olympics. In conjunction with his filming exploits, Crisler erected a series of backcountry shelters and caches for storing supplies. After Crisler's marriage to Lois Brown, a University of Washington English teacher, Lois and Herb together hiked and filmed Olympic wildlife. Between 1941 and 1951, Humes Ranch on the Elwha River served as their winter headquarters. One winter, the winter of 1942-43, the Crislers acted as Aircraft Warning Service observers at a lockout on Hurricane Ridge. After this experience in the snow, the Crislers made regular winter ski trips to the high Olympics. During the 1940s, Herb and Lois produced many long and short films depicting the wilderness of the Olympics. Beginning in 1948 the Crislers began traveling nationwide to lecture and show their wildlife films. From 1949 to 1951 Lois Crisler wrote weekly columns for the Port Angeles Evening News in which she described wilderness life in the Olympics. In 1949 Walt Disney agreed to purchase the Crislers' elk film footage to show on his nationally televised program, the "True-Life Adventure* series. The film was released in 1952. For several years following, the Crislers contracted with Disney Studios to film bighorn sheep in Colorado, grizzly bears in Mount McKinley National Park, and wolves and caribou in the Brooks Range. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 10' x 12'; 1 story; pole wall construction sheathed with vertical boards; modified gable roof with wood shakes; no foundation (7); no windows (?); 1 doorway. Alterations: none known. Siting: (unknown).

SIGNIFICANCE

Crisler's "Poaching Cabin" is ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The structure has little significant historical value, and is not particularly distinctive architecturally. In 1984 the building is in deteriorated condition.



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REMANN CABIN



Click on photo to enlarge




Remann Cabin spacer Remann Cabin

Photos by HJT from NWHikers.net taken between 1991 and 2002 of Remanns Cabin.

Remanns Cabin

Remanns Cabin. Photo by Hesmeister in 2011 from NWHikers.net

Remann Cabin


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

An ardent fishing enthusiast from Tacoma, Washington, Frederick Gordon Remann conmissioned Elwha River settler Grant Humes to erect this cabin in 1926. Remann christened his personal cabin Elk Lick Lodge. Long known as one of the best trout fishing rivers in the Olympics, Remann began making annual pilgrimages to the Elwha to fish, even before the construction of his cabin. Alone, or with friends or family, Frederick Remann continued his vacation fishing expeditions to the Elwha River nearly until the time of his death in 1949. Known locally for his prowess as an angler, Frederick G. Remann was among the more prominent regular visitors to the Elwha River Valley. As a resident of Tacoma, Remann gained acclaim and stature in local and state politics. He began his career as the Pierce County prosecuting attorney (1915-1919) and ascended to superior court judge (1926-1948). Judge Remann's Elk Lick Lodge is one of five known private vacation cabins built on the Elwha, all of which were constructed in the 1920s. Originally erected on a low bank adjoining the Elwha, the Elk Lick Lodge was disassembled and relocated using the same logs, to higher ground around 1939 when the flooding Elwha threatened to destroy the cabin. The cabin has stood at its present location since then. In 1984 Remann's Elk Lick Lodge is one of only two extant private fishing/hunting cabins on the Elwha and in Olympic National Park (the other being the H. H. Botten, or Wilder Cabin). Rectangular in shape; measures 12' x 16' with 6' x 12' porch; 1 story; log wall construction with dovetail corner joints; shakes in gable ends; gable roof with cedar shakes; exposed rafters and purlins; log foundation; fixed, multi-light windows (some windows gone), wood door; interior wood flooring. Alterations: structure moved and rebuilt (using same logs) in 1939. Siting: approx. 10' from bluff overlooking Elwha River in stand of hemlock trees.

SIGNIFICANCE

Frederick Remann's Elk Lick Lodge is eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Built as a vacation-fishing cabin for private use, the cabin represents an earlier era of recreational use of the interior Olympic Peninsula, which, as an isolated rugged area, remained a virtual wilderness well into the twentieth century. Recreational fishing and hunting was not pursued in earnest on the Elwha until the 1910s following a brief period of initial settlement in the lower Elwha drainage. Grant Humes, who constructed the Elk Lick Lodge, was among the earliest settlers on the lower Elwha and gained a widespread local reputation for his skill as a hunter, packer and guide. Elk Lick Lodge is notable for its association with. in addition to Grant Humes, Frederick Remann, who was widely known for his stature in law and politics in the state of Washington. Architecturally, the cabin is an excellent example of well-built handcrafted log cabin construction, exhibiting fine tenon-shaped corner notching. Although the cabin's windows, porch, and many shakes on the roof have been subjected to deterioration and vandalism (since the cabin stands on the main heavily trafficked Elwha River trail), the cabin retains much of its physical integrity. In addition, to its overall integrity of design, workmanship, and materials, the cabin possesses integrity of location, setting (since ca. 1939), feeling, and association.



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SKI LAIR



Click on photo to enlarge




Ski Lair


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Herb Crisler built the Ski Lair shelter in 1944 shortly after Herb and Lois Crisler spent the winter of 1942 - 43 at Hurricane Ridge as Aircraft Warning Service observers, where they developed a fondness for skiing. According to author Ruby Hult, the Ski Lair, and the Halfway House, another shelter, were used by the Crislers and their friends on winter ski weekends in the Hurricane Ridge area. The Ski Lair was the destination shelter for skiers making the trek from Whiskey Bend Trailhead on the Elwha River to Hurricane Ridge. The Ski Lair stands about half a mile below the ridge. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. 12' x 20'; one-story; horizontal log construction with one wall of earth; low sloping gable roof with long cedar shakes; dirt foundation (?); no windows (?). Alterations: none known; building now in deteriorated condition with roof partially collapsed. Siting: at the edge of a clearing, built into a steep sloping hillside.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Ski Lair is not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The structure is less than fifty years old. Historically, the shelter has no known special significance. Presently there is considerable loss of physical integrity due to the deteriorated condition of the structure.



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ELWHA RANGER STATION RESIDENCE



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RANGER RESIDENCE - 1




Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

Locally significant under Criteria A and C; period of significance 1930-1936.

The Elwha Ranger Station Historic District is comprised of 14 buildings and some small scale and landscape features located on both sides of the Elwha River Road, within OLYM. Organized into a residential (east side of road) and utility/maintenance (west side), the building are a variety of shapes, sizes and functions. It is a cohesive complex of milled wood construction with (primarily) shake-covered gable roofs. The buildings are in good condition [2005] and continue to function and appear much as they did historically after their construction in the 1930s by the USFS. The complex is an example of two property types identified in the MPD form for the Historic Resources of OLYM: Government (USFS) and Architecture (Bungalow/Craftsman). Only one building has been moved from its original location, but remains within the district. Overall, the district retains integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1932
AD
1963
AD
USFS
Architect
2. 
Rehabilitated
1942
AD

AD
CCC
Architect


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake
3. 
Foundation
Concrete
4. 
Framing
Wood


Short Physical Description:

Rectangular in shape 26' x 32'; 1 1/2 stories; half-log siding, tow widths alternating; medium pitch gable roof, exposed rafters with knee-brace; 1 over 1 double-hung windows; storage woodshed 1980's; exterior walls originally unpainted



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ELWHA RANGER STATION BUNKHOUSE



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RANGER BUNKHOUSE




Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

Locally significant under Criteria A and C; period of significance 1930-1936.

The Elwha Ranger Station Historic District is comprised of 14 buildings and some small scale and landscape features located on both sides of the Elwha River Road, within OLYM. Organized into a residential (east side of road) and utility/maintenance (west side), the building are a variety of shapes, sizes and functions. It is a cohesive complex of milled wood construction with (primarily) shake-covered gable roofs. The buildings are in good condition [2005] and continue to function and appear much as they did historically after their construction in the 1930s by the USFS. The complex is an example of two property types identified in the MPD form for the Historic Resources of OLYM: Government (USFS) and Architecture (Bungalow/Craftsman). Only one building has been moved from its original location, but remains within the district. Overall, the district retains integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1932
AD


USFS
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake
3. 
Framing
Wood
4. 
Foundation
Concrete


Short Physical Description:

Rectangular, 18' x 14', 1-1/2 stories, wood foundation. Wood-frame construction, sided with horiz. half logs of 2 widths. Gable roof sheathed with wood shakes, extended eaves and exposed rafter ends and knee braces on gable ends. 1-over-1 dbl-hung windows. Gable-roofed porch w/ sqrd. wooden posts.



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HAPPY HOLLOW SHELTER



Click on photo to enlarge




HAPPY HOLLOW SHELTER

HAPPY HALLOW SHELTER - 1 - 2005
Happy Hallow - 1 - Shelter - 2005
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net
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Happy Hallow - 2 - Shelter - 2005
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net
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Happy Hallow - 3 - Shelter - 2005
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net




Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Happy Hollow Shelter is individually eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

It is one of only five remaining shelters within Olympic National Park representing the final program of shelter construction. Happy Hollow shelter exemplifies the continuing National Park Service commitment to providing recreational trailside shelters at popular backcountry locations. The structure retains integrity of design, location, materials, and workmanship.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1964
AD
1964
AD
National Park Service
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Happy Hollow shelter is a three-sided structure measuring roughly 14 wide by 14 deep.

Long Physical Description:

The wall and sill logs average 11 in diameter and rest on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 6 x2 in height, while the front opening was seven feet, and a ridge of 9. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 10 diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof purlin. Five rows of rafters support nine boards for the shake roof.



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HAYES RANGER STATION



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HAYES RANGER STATION

HAYES CABIN - 2006
Hayes Cabin - 2006
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net
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Hayes Guard Station - 1 - 2002
Posted by RodF on NWHikers.net
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Hayes River Guard Station - 2 - 2002
Posted by HJT on NWHikers.net and taken between 1992 and 2005
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Hayes Shed - 2005
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net


Hayes River Ranger Station

Hayes Ranger Station. Photo by Hesmeister in 2011 from NWHikers.net




Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Hayes River Patrol Cabin is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

The structure as it stands today retains the significant physical characteristics of the original guard station. The site as a whole possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association. We have not determined the exact date of construction but a 1930 map indicates a Hayes River Guard Station. We do know that the guard station was extensively rehabilitated in 1970 by the YCC under the supervision of Fred Militech under the general direction of trails foreman, Ernie Vail. The entire log structure of the cabin was replaced at that time, replicating the original wall and roof structure. It was placed on the original stone rubble foundation. New windows were installed on three sides. An historic window was replaced on the front elevation. The completed rehabilitation retains the look, feeling and character of the property.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1930
AD
1940
AD
USFS
Other
2. 
Rehabilitated
1970
AD
1970
AD
National Park Service
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Hayes River Patrol Cabin is a rectangular log cabin measuring 20 long by 17 6 wide with a porch across the full front of the cabin measuring 7 long by 17 6 wide.

Long Physical Description:

It has an 8 in 12 pitch gable roof with six log purlins on each side of the gable including the ridge log spaced at 20 inches on center. The purlins serve as the nailers for the 36 long cedar shakes. The wall logs average 8 in diameter. The gable end logs measure 6 inches in diameter. The flooring is 1x4 tongue and groove fir. The door surface is two sawed logs 2 1/2 thick by 15 wide. All four walls have one window approximately 29 x 34. The interior has two built-in bunks and two wood constructed tables.



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WILDER SHELTER



Click on photo to enlarge




WILDER SHELTER

WILDER SHELTER - 1 - 2005
Wilder Shelter - 1 - 2005
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net
As of 2007, Wilder had only two walls partially standing. Duck mentioned that it was "on his list" but was unsure whether enough (any?) of the original members were sound enough to make restoration possible. (By RodF on NWHikers.net)
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Wilder Shelter - 2 - 2005
Posted by Bruce on NWHikers.net


Click here for new photos of the rebuilt shelter done in 2011


Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Wilder Shelter is individually eligible, along with the other two shelters of this design, for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

These shelters represent a specific management period in the Park history that sought to provide trail shelters at popular backcountry locations. At the same time, the design sought to be more durable and require less maintenance, more compact in character for small hiking parties, and less visible on the landscape. Wilder Shelter is one of the few remaining shelters to reflect a policy to develop a new generation of recreational shelters.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1951
AD
1951
AD
National Park Service
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Log
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Wilder Shelter is a three-sided solid log structure measuring roughly 12 x 12

Long Physical Description:

The wall and sill logs measured 10 in diameter and rested on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 4 feet in height, while the front opening was six feet. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 6 diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof beam. Four 5rafters spanned front to back along the slope of the roof. Eight 3 shake nailer poles crossed the rafters and were covered with 20 long hand-split cedar shakes.



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