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CRESCENT AREA



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CASTLE-IN-THE-CAT SHELTER



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Castle In The Cat - 1994 spacer Castle In The Cat - 2000 spacer Castle In The Cat - 1994 - Interior spacer Castle In The Cat - 1994

Photos one and two are from Bruce on NWHikers.net and taken in 1994 and 2000.
Photos three and four are from Bruce on NWHikers.net and taken in 1994.

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Photos one to four are from Bruce on NWHikers.net and taken in 1994, 1996 and 1998.

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Photos one and two are from Bruce on NWHikers.net and taken in 1998 and 2000.
Photo three is from RodF on NWHikers.net and taken in 1994.

Castle-In-The-Cat Shelter


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

This shelter built by the Crislers and a youth from California, who came to spend a month with the Crislers in the Olympics, was begun in 1944. It was one of a series of shelters and caches built by the Crislers for use during their summer filming expeditions in the Olympics. Herb Crisler, a native of Georgia, took up residency on the Olympic Peninsula in 1919, after serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps Spruce Production Division at Pysht, on the peninsula's north coast. During his first years on the peninsula he opened a photo finishing studio and produced postcards of wildlife scenes he photographed in the Olympics. In addition, he engaged in building construction during the cloudy wet months of the year. During the early and mid 1920s, Crisler hiked extensively in the interior Olympics and built cabins and hunting shelters at strategic places in the mountains. After leaving the peninsula briefly in the late 1920s to pursue an unsuccessful career in the commercial airplane business in Seattle, Crisler returned to make his widely publicized cross-Olympic trek without food or hunting weapons. In 1934, Herb Crisler, determined to make a career in wildlife photography, resumed making summer hiking expeditions into the Olympics. In conjunction with his filming exploits, Crisler erected a series of backcountry shelters and caches for storing supplies. After Crisler's marriage to Lois Brown, a University of Washington English teacher, Lois and Herb together hiked and filmed Olympic wildlife. Humes Ranch Between 1941 and 1951 Humes Ranch on the Elwha Rive served as their winter headquarters. One winter, the winter of 1942-43, the Crislers acted as Aircraft Warning Service observers at a lockout on Hurricane Ridge. After this experience in the snow, the Crislers made regular winter ski trips to the high Olympics. During the 1940s Herb and Lois produced many long and short films depicting the wilderness of the Olympics. Beginning in 1948 the Crislers began traveling nationwide to lecture and show their wildlife films. From 1949 to 1951 Lois Crisler wrote weekly columns for the Port Angeles Evening News in which she described the wilderness life in the Olympics. In 1949 Walt Disney agreed to purchase the Crislers' elk film footage to show on his nationally televised program, the True-Life Adventure series. The film was released in 1952. For several years following, the Crislers contracted with Disney Studios to film bighorn sheep in Colorado, grizzly bears in Mount McKinley National Park, and wolves and caribou in the Brooks Range. The Castle-In-the-Cat Shelter is one of the best-preserved Crisler shelters standing in the Olympic Mountains today. Rectangular in shape; measures approx. l4' x 16'; 1 story; peeled-pole wall construction sided with cedar shakes; modified gable roof with cedar shakes; no foundation (dirt floor); 1 window and door on east elevation. Alterations: "stabilization" of structure in 1977. Siting; located in sub-alpine meadow, nestled in trees, off the Cat Basin trail.

SIGNIFICANCE

The Castle-in-the-Cat Shelter is not eligible for the National Register. The structure is less than 50 years old. Because it probably is the most widely known about and used Crisler shelter. it receives more extensive use by summer hikers. Minimal physical integrity of the shelter has been lost due to the efforts of those who wish to see the life of the shelter continue. In the 1994 the structure may be eligible for the National Register.

Note from Elder Bob:

The above study was done in the 1980's. Since then, the following was published in the Bremerton Sun in 2002. All that is left is pictures and memories.

Crumbling cabin testimony to indifference

Seabury Blair Jr. Mr. Outdoors

More than anyone, Herb and Lois Crisler brought the magic of the Olympic Mountain outdoors to the rest of the world. Today, they are scarcely remembered in the national park they helped create, and that is a shame.

Herb began wandering the Olympic wilderness in 1918 - 20 years before Olympic National Park was created. He left tracks where no white man had ever been.

The only official reference to the Crislers you might hear is at an Olympic National Park evening program showing the Walt Disney nature film "The Olympic Elk." Crisler photographed the movie, and some scenes were shot long before the park was created.

Herb met Lois Brown, a University of Washington English instructor and member of the Seattle Mountaineers, in 1940. She loved the Olympic high country almost as much as Herb, and the two were married a year later.

Crisler built several shelters in the Olympic wilderness, which he used as headquarters first for his hunting trips and later when he began hunting with a movie camera. His first camera was an old hand-cranked, 100-pound Pathe he bought for $25. He carried it with him into the mountains and produced his first film, "From the Mountains to the Sea," in 1924.

One of the first shelters he built was Hot Cake Shelter, in 1922. Herb and Lois eventually built eight shelters throughout the mountains. All of those historic structures have been destroyed by man or nature. That is tragic, particularly since one of Olympic National Park's Congressional mandates is to preserve historic objects within the park for future generations.

I am particularly saddened at the latest of the Crislers' Olympic legacies to crumble: the Castle-in-the-Cat, built in 1944. Lois gave it that name after Herb packed in a cast-iron stove and so many amenities that Lois declared it "a castle."

I first visited the Castle-in-the-Cat in 1975, more or less stumbling upon it while following the rugged, untrailed ridge between Appleton Pass and High Divide. I wandered into a clearing, and there it was: a rustic cedar-shake cabin, complete with wood stove, shuttered window openings and rugged split-shake cabinetry.

Inside, I found a few staples and a "guest register" of hikers who had found the Castle before me. Hikers' names on that register dated back to the early 1750s, people surprised and thankful to find such splendid accommodations in the high mountains where official Olympic National Park maps said no shelter existed.

Whenever I hike around the Cat Creek wilderness, I return to the Castle to see how the historic structure is holding up. Last month I returned to find the Castle has crumbled, after six decades of neglect by the very agency charged with preserving it.

The Castle, I was told by rangers, had collapsed from recent heavy winter snow loads. It is going to be allowed to "recycle back to nature," as one backcountry ranger put it.

As I said, I find that both tragic and negligent. The Crislers were strong supporters of Olympic National Park and deserve to be remembered for their contribution. No better way could be found than restoring the Castle and keeping it as a tiny island of comfort and warmth in the wilderness.

Strong hikers who would like to see the remains of the Castle can follow the High Divide Trail past Heart Lake for 8.7 miles, then turn southeast on the High Divide East Trail and drop into Cat Creek Basin 1.5 miles to the Cat Creek Basin Trail.

Turn left, or east, on the Cat Creek Basin Trail and follow it as it drops into the beautiful subalpine meadow of Cat Creek Basin, about a mile. You'll find a couple of numbered campsites in the basin. Pick up the way trail to the Castle at Campsite No. 2.

Walk southeast from this campsite about 20 feet until you see a trail switching back to the east and dropping steeply to a creek. Follow the trail across the creek and up a steep hillside to the northeast.

At the top of the hill, the trail meanders through meadows past several tarns to the east, and appears to disappear at the head of a tiny creek that trickles to the south. Follow the faint trail along the creek before crossing it and traversing a brushy hillside to the east.

You should be able to make out a faint way trail where it crosses the creek and heads east. Walk about 100 feet into a clearing filled with beargrass and a tiny bathtub-sized pond and look to the north to find the remains of the Castle.

Imagine the work it took to build, the love and dedication its builders put into it, the sweat in carrying a stove all the way from Olympic Hot Springs. Think of the countless number of backpackers who settled there in comfort for a night. Perhaps you might ask, like me, why anyone would allow such a link to their Olympic heritage to be destroyed. Published in Bremerton, WA in The Sun: 08/27/2000



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NORTH FORK SOLEDUCK SHELTER



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North Fork Soleduck Shelter - 1996 spacer North Fork Soleduck Shelter - 1996

North Fork Sol Duc Shelter, 1996 - The N Fk shelter has since been beautifully restored by volunteers from Port Angeles.

Photos furnished by RodF from NWHikers.net

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Photos furnished by HJT from NWHikers.net

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Photos furnished by Goats Gone Wild from NWHikers.net and taken in 2009. Shows Shelter Sign (#1), Forest Service Signage (#3) and Shake Splitter (#4)

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Photos furnished by Goats Gone Wild from NWHikers.net and taken in 2009. Shows Hand Made Ladder (#1), Back of Shelter (#2) and Interior (#3 and #4).

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Photos furnished by Goats Gone Wild from NWHikers.net and taken in 2009. Shows Old Date on Wall (#1), List of Shelter Heros (#2) and Dry Wood Supply (#3).

North Fork Soleduck Shelter


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Built around 1936 the North Fork Soleduck Shelter is one of dozens of trail shelters erected by the U.S. Forest Service in the late 1920s and 1930s on the Olympic Peninsula. Unlike many early Forest Service-built shelters that were constructed in lowland valleys, this shelter was built at a higher elevation along a probably once- popular hiking route between Lake Crescent and Olympic (Boulder) Hot Springs Resort. The U.S. Forest Service, who had jurisdiction over much of the area now included in Olympic National Park from 1905 to 193S, initiated shelter construction in the late 1920s and the 1930s. Shelter construction coincided with a period of active trail construction by the Forest Service. Shelters were at first intended for use by crews building and maintaining trails and laying telephone lines for fire protection purposes. As part of the Forest Service's multiple land use management policy, trails and shelters served to encourage backcountry recreational use in the interior Olympics. In the 1930s, CCC corpsmen under the supervision of the Forest Service, accelerated shelter and trail construction activity. By the late 1930s nearly 90 shelters stood on the Olympic Peninsula. The greatest abundance of shelters built in the 1930s occurred on the north and east facing slopes of the Olympic Range. During this initial period of construction, shelters were built primarily in lowland valleys along major rivers and creeks, and sited at locations where the fishing and scenery was attractive. In some instances (particularly along the Bogachlel River), shelters supplanted or augmented existing ranger or guard stations, or were constructed at existing popular hunting or fishing "camps" (especially along the Elwha River). Typically, shelters stood from three to five miles apart on established trails. Architecturally, these Forest Service-built shelters dating from the 1930s were made from local materials obtained from the building site, were constructed of peeled-pole or split-cedar lumber sheathed with cedar shakes. They were capped with gable or shed, cedar shake roofs. Shelters were three-sided, and roomy enough to provide several people protection from the inclement weather typical on the peninsula. Significant numbers of the late 1920s and 1930s Forest Service-type shelters were taken down in the mid 1970s, and in 1984 fewer than twenty remain standing. Rectangular in plan; measures approx. 10' x 14'; 1 story; peeled-pole wall construction with vertical, split fir board siding; modified gable with (long) shakes and pole rafters; foundation; horizontal split logs resting on approx. 2' long horizontal log sections; dirt floor; bunks cover back wall. Alterations: none known. Siting; approx. 4 yards off of North Fork of Soleduck River on narrow embankment clearing; at end of trail.

SIGNIFICANCE

The North Fork Soleduck is presently eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. The structure is nearly fifty years old. Alterations appear to be minimal, and architecturally. It is a good representative example of the type of Forest Service shelter built in the 1930s.



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PYRAMID PEAK LOOKOUT



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Restoration since completed by Don Houck, ONP Backcountry Carpenter.

Photos furnished by HJT and RodF from NWHikers.net. Second and third one taken 2007 by Rod.

Pyramid Peak Lookout


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Pyramid Peak Lookout was built as an Aircraft Warning Service (AWS) lookout in the fall of 1942 expressly for the purpose of spotting enemy aircraft during World War II. Under the direction of the U.S. Army, the AWS was initiated in 1942 when the threat of enemy air attack on the West Coast loomed large in the minds of many military strategists. Small ground based observation posts were activated throughout the Pacific Northwest beginning in that summer and continuing through the winter of 1942-1943. With the U.S. Forest Service as coordinating agency for the establishment of AWS observation posts, thirteen sites within the present boundaries of the park were established as AWS lockouts. (A fourteenth AWS structure now stands on the western boundary between the park and Olympic National Forest.) Pyramid Peak and Dodger Point lockouts are the only two lockouts still standing totally in the park that were utilized as AWS posts. Following World War II Pyramid Peak Lookout remained in use as fire detection lookout. Rectangular in plan; measures 16' x 13' with 8' x 7' woodshed off north elevation; 1 story; wood-frame wall construction with cedar shake siding; gable roof with wood shakes; shed roof with shakes over woodshed portion; horizontal sill resting on stone foundation; 1 window opening (without glazing) on each elevation; door removed. Alterations: none apparent. Siting: mountain peak overlooking Lake Crescent.

SIGNIFICANCE

In 1984 Pyramid Peak A.W.S. Lookout is not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, since the building is less than fifty years old. Historically, the Pyramid Peak Lookout is significant for its role in the air defense efforts on the West Coast of the U.S. during World War II. Although the structure suffers from lack of maintenance and vandalism, it stands as one of the few extant AWS lockouts in western Washington. Pyramid Peak Lookout may be eligible for National Register Listing in 1994.



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LAKE CRESCENT LODGES



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Rosemary Inn Exterior
Automobiles arrived at Rosemary Inn only by ferry, before the early 1920s. (Courtesy of Olympic National Park)
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Formal gardens graced the clearing at Rosemary Inn in the 1930s. (Photo by Simmer Studio, courtesy of Bert Kellogg Collection)


The stone fireplace and balustraded stairway in the Rosemary Inn lodge, as they appeared in 1983, represent the work of a skilled local craftsman. (Photo by M. Stupich, courtesy of National Park Service, Pacific Northwest Region)
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A settler's home situated on the north side of Lake Crescent commands a grand view of the north Olympic Mountains, as depicted in this photograph taken around 1910. (Photo by A. Curtis, courtesy of Washington State Historical Society)





Rosemary Inn Today




From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

From Historic Resource Study 1983 Olympic National Park
By Gail E. H. Evans and T. Allan Comp
Cultural Resources Division
National Park Service

Although most of the early resort hotels bordering the shores of Lake Crescent have burned or been removed, two resort complexes dating from the mid 1910s and 1920s remain standing to the present day. On Barnes Point on the south shore of Lake Crescent, Singer's Tavern (now Lake Crescent Lodge) and Rosemary Inn were opened to the public almost simultaneously. Separated now by only a few hundred yards of thick forest broken by small overgrown clearings, the main lodge and ancillary groups of cabins and utility buildings of both complexes form two uniquely different and distinctive recreational facilities that represent the early resort era on Lake Crescent. The combined effect of the physical arrangement of these buildings, their scale, setting, landscaping, historical integrity of physical fabric, as well as the relatively close proximity of Rosemary Inn and Singer's Tavern, create a mood and sense of time evocative of the 1910s and 1920s resort establishments that exist nowhere else on Lake Crescent. Within two years after Harymere, an early Barnes Point resort was destroyed by fire. Rose Littleton purchased land near the ashes of Harymere from the Barnes family. Shortly afterward, a small, wood frame, one-and-one-half story main lodge was constructed at the rear of a small clearing that opened onto the lake. The new resort was immediately christened "Rosemary," a name derived from Rose Littleton and Mary Daum, Rose Littleton's longtime assistant. A tall, rustic, peeled pole entrance gate with latticework and large "Rosemary" lettering at the top was erected near the water's edge to welcome travelers whose principal access to the resort was by water. A thirty-foot steel windmill was erected near the entrance gate. Typical of many early Lake Crescent resorts, the Rosemary Inn buildings were not a1l constructed immediately. At first a line of canvas-wall tents was set up along both edges of the small meadow to accommodate Rosemary guests. Over a period of five to fifteen years, small individually designed cabins were built at random locations around the meadow and at the forest's edge (NPS OLYM Historic photo collection). John Daum (brother of Mary Daum), Port Angeles builder and craftsman, is credited with the design and construction of most of the Rosemary Inn buildings as well as the handcrafted interiors and lawn furniture (NARS: RG 79 1943, 18 May). By the mid-1930s, about twenty cabins (NPS OLYM 1936, 185), plus outbuildings, including a boathouse, a 'shop, a generator house, and woodshed, stood on the Rosemary Inn grounds. After 1922, when a road along the south shore of Lake Crescent was completed, a second entrance gate with "Rosemary" lettering in a peered stick motif, was erected near the main lodge at the end of a long driveway which connected with the highway. After the principal means of access to the resort was changed from the lake to the south shore road, a masonry and log fireplace shelter was constructed at the water's edge.

In the late 1920s or early 1930s, the main lodge received additions on the east and west ends of the building. Over the years, proprietor Rose Littleton cultivated a large swath of the eastern section of meadow, planting fruit trees, exotic non-native shrubs, and flowers. Trellises and stone and concrete fountains and fonts completed the landscape design (NPS OLYM Historic photo collection).

Among Rosemary Inn's most prominent visitors were United States political leaders who played major roles in the establishment creation of Olympic National Park. Less than one year before the passage of a Congressional bill authorizing the creation of the park. President Franklin D. Roosevelt toured the Olympic Peninsula. On 31 September and 1 October 1937, the presidential party visited Lake Crescent. The entourage stayed at Singer's Tavern (Lake Crescent Lodge) and break fasted at Rosemary. Nine years later Secretary of the Interior Julius A. Krug led the dedication ceremony of Olympic National Park at Rosemary Inn (Neat 1978). (Nearly fifty years Tater, on 30 August 1983, Secretary of the Interior James Watt repeated the visit of an U. S. Interior Secretary. Watt and Olympic National Park Superintendent Robert Chandler and other administrative staff gathered and ate lunch at the Rosemary fireplace shelter on the Lake Crescent shore. )

Rosemary Inn remained under the ownership of Rose Littleton until the early 1940s. In 1942 Rosemary Inn was one of four or five vacation retreats in the park that Olympic National Park Superintendent Macy recommended to the Director of the National Park Service. In a memorandum dated 5 October of that year Macy wrote, "The Rosemary Inn property . . . we feel affords an ideal place for anyone to relax. Here pleasant cottages are available under the European plan and this place is on the shore of Lake Crescent where boating and bathing may be enjoyed" (NARS: RG 79 1942, 5 October). In 1943, by agreement with Rose Littleton and a general concession contract with the National Park Service, the National Park Concessions, Incorporated, took over operation of Rosemary. One year later the Department of the Interior consummated acquisition of the thirty-year-old resort (DM 1943, 26 August; 1944, 12 April).

In recognition of Rosemary Inn's distinctive arch1tecture, nearly unaltered site plan, and its significance as one of the few remaining resort ensembles dating from Lake Crescent's early days as a resort area on the Olympic Peninsula. The Rosemary Inn group of buildings was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. In 1983 it is the only historic building ensemble in Olympic National Park listed in the National Register.

Singers Tavern
Smoke blew from the chimney of Singer's Tavern (Lake Crescent Lodge), located on Lake Crescent's Barnes Point, about three years after the 1915 construction of the lodge and several cabins
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Wildlife and Craftsman style furniture decorate the interior of Singer's Tavern lobby, in the 1920s


Singers Tavern Today


Singer's Tavern (now Lake Crescent Lodge), the only other extant and intact collection of early resort buildings on Lake Crescent, was established on Barnes Point in 1915 several hundred yards west of Rosemary Inn. Locating on the north shore of Lake Crescent in 1907, Mr. and Mrs., A1 Singer later traded their home and property with Mrs. Helen Burkhart, who owned several acres on the south shoreline at the mouth of Barnes Creek. The property transaction was consummated and the Singers incorporated in December 1914 (Lauridsen and Smith 1937, 222; PAEN 1953, 28 November). In a large open field dotted with coniferous trees, the Singers immediately erected a two-story wood frame main lodge building several feet back from the water's edge, and, behind that, a single row of sixteen closely-spaced cottages. A wide veranda extended across the length of the main building and afforded guests a panoramic view of Lake Crescent and wooded peaks rising from the north shore. In the open field behind the cabins a garden was planted (Olympic header 1915, 7 May; Seattle, Port Angeles and Western Railway Company 7915). Longtime Lake Crescent resident Connie Lawrence described one aspect of the guest cabin accommodations before the cabins were plumbed with running water: "Every morning a boy would pull a wagon containing a huge can of hot water along the walk in front of the cabins, and from it he would fill the large earthenware pitchers which had been set out on the porches the night before" (Lawrence 1971, 409).

In its early years of prosperity Singer's Tavern was extremely popular among visitors to Lake Crescent. Before the completion of the south shore road in 1922, guests were met at East Beach, where the road from Port Angeles ended, and transported by private launch to Singer's. Through the Initial effort of the Singers, the resort became widely known as a social gathering place and entertained many annual meetings and outing clubs (Lauridsen and Smith 1937, 222, Lawrence 1971, 409).

Over time the Singers and subsequent owners made improvements and added to the complex of early buildings. Eventually electric lights and running water were installed at Singer's, and more cabins were added to the resort complex. In the late 1920s the Singers sold their establishment to the Seattle Trust Company and moved to California. By the mid-1930s Singer's Tavern (by then renamed Lake Crescent Tavern) included approximately 100 acres, the main lodge building, and thirty to forty cabins and was valued at between $100,000 and $150,000 (NPS OLYM 1936, 185).

During its sixty-eight-year history, Singer's Tavern hosted guests of considerable fame. When President Roosevelt visited the Olympic Peninsula in the fall of 1937, the president, Washington State political leaders, and Forest and Park Service administrative staff gathered at Singer's Tavern to discuss the controversial proposal to establish a large Olympic National Park. Present at these meetings were Washington Senators Mon Wallgren {author of bills to create a national park on the Peninsula) and Homer T. Bone, and such well-known journalists as Drew Pearson and William Allen, (lse 1961, 388; Lawrence 1971, 412). This event marked the first visit of a United States president to Clallam County (Lauridsen and Smith 1937, 222). Less than one year later, largely because of the energetic and persistent efforts of President Roosevelt and Secretary of the interior Ickes, the U.S. Congress approved a bill to establish Olympic National Park. Singer's Tavern has been the choice of other prominent guests, including inventor and philanthropist Henry Ford, singer Frank Sinatra, Supreme Court Justice William 0. Douglas and his wife (on their honeymoon), and U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Robert Kennedy (Roe 1979, 42).

The changing means of transportation in the Lake Crescent area during the 1920s and early 1930s altered the complexion of public resort development around the lake. In 1922 the road bordering the south shore of the lake was completed; ferry service between East Beach and Fairholme was discontinued in 1925; and, in 1931 the Olympic Peninsula loop highway that connected with the Lake Crescent segment was dedicated. Older lakeside resorts reoriented themselves physically to the highway, and new resort facilities catered to the growing numbers of the motoring public. Forester W. H. Homing observed a stratification of Lake Crescent resorts in the mid-1930s. The better resorts (presumably the more established hotels and inns) operated on "the American hotel plan using detached cabins for sleeping quarters and serving meals in typical hotel dining rooms." Others offered housekeeping rooms for rent and guests prepared their own meals (NPS OLYM 1936, 184).



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SOLEDUCK FALLS SHELTER



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Photos furnished by HJT and RodF from NWHikers.net. First one taken by HJT between 1992 - 2005.

Second and third one taken 1999 and 2005 by Rod.

Soleduck Falls Shelter



CCC projects did much to encourage the recreational development of areas now in Olympic National Park. The Soleduck Falls shelter, constructed in 1939, stands today as an excellent example of the craftsmanship practiced by the CCC prior to, and during, the formative years of Olympic National Park. (Photo by M. Stupich, courtesy of National Park Service, Pacific Northwest Region)



From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Soon after the creation of Olympic Rational Park in 1938, a contingent of CCC enrollees erected three trailside shelters in the park during the summer and fall of 1939. Of the three, located at Moose Lake, Hoh Lake, and Soleduck Falls, the Rustic Style, T-shape shelter at Soleduck Falls is the only one that remains standing. Begun in the early summer of 1939 by CCC corpsmen from Camp Elwha based at Eagle Guard Station side camp (now Soleduck Ranger Station), the shelter was 90 percent completed by the end of July 1939. Built of native materials. in scale with, and sensitive to, its immediate surroundings, the structure is an excellent example of Rustic Style architecture. T-shaped in plan; main body measures 11' x 24'6" stem of' 'T' measures 10' x 10'; log wall construction with common (saddle), corner joints; hewn, pointed log ends at corners; vertical half-log siding with lancet, pointed ends in gable ends of main body; cross gable roof with exposed rafters; sheathed with wood shakes; concrete foundation; no window openings; open called "'T" portion extends from wide opening on west facade of main block of shelter. Alterations: possibly recent addition of concrete foundation; new bunks installed in 1981-82. Siting: wooded, high bank above Soleduck River; approx. 30' east of trail.

SIGNIFICANCE

Soleduck Falls Shelter meets the criteria for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Its distinctive design, attention to detail, use of native building materials, noteworthy quality of craftsmanship, and its non-intrusive siting make it an excellent example of rustic style architecture popularized by the National Park Service between 1916 and 1942. As one of possibly three other shelters in Olympic National Park constructed of this unique design type. It is now the only extant example in the park. It possesses integrity of location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. As a product of CCC efforts, the structure is historically important because of the nationwide impact the CCC had on conservation of natural resources on public lands in the U.S., on stabilizing and boosting regional economic conditions,



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SOURDOUGH SHELTER



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Sourdough Shelter Sourdough Shelter Sourdough Shelter Sourdough Shelter

Photos 1 and 2 taken by Lotus54 from NWHikers.com and taken in 1990.

Photo 3 is taken by Olympic Hiker from NWHikers.net and taken in 2010.

Photo 4 taken by Lotus54 from NWHikers.com and taken in 1972.


Sourdough Shelter


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

The U.S. National Forest Service constructed Sourdough Shelter around 1932, during the twenty-eight periods (1905-1933) of Forest Service administration of Mount Olympus National Monument and Olympic National Forest. This shelter was one of numerous shelters constructed by the Forest Service primarily for trail construction and maintenance crews and fire prevention purposes. The Sourdough Shelter has experienced significant deterioration in the last decade. Square in plan; measures 14' x 14'; 1 story; peeled-pole wall construction with shake siding; modified shed roof with pole rafters and shakes; logon rock foundation; no windows or door, but entire south elevation is open; bunk beds along rear wall; dirt floor. Alterations: none known. Siting: at edge of open meadow.

SIGNIFICANCE

Sourdough Shelter is ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Although it dates from one of the earliest periods of extensive shelter construction by the Forest Service, severe deterioration of the walls and roof have eroded the structure's physical integrity, such that in 1982) the shelter is a poor representative example of the Adirondack pole-and-shake type of construction executed by the Forest Service. The building has no known historical significance.



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STORM KING GUARD STATION



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Storm King Guard Station (Morgenroth cabin), built soon after the turn-of-the-century on the south shore Lake Crescent, is one of the oldest extant National Forest Service constructed buildings on the Olympic Peninsula. In 1983, the eighty year old Storm King Guard Station, although damaged, has retained much of its original exterior integrity. (Top photo courtesy of Olympic National Park; Lower photo by M. Stupich, courtesy of National Park Service, Pacific Northwest Region)


Storm King Guard Station spacer Storm King Guard Station


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Although there is disagreement about the precise construction date of the Storm King Guard Station, this one-and one-half story log building was probably built around 1905 when the National Forest Service gained jurisdiction of Olympic Forest Reserve. Local folklore credits a Norwegian craftsman with the actual construction of the building. Since its construction the building has been closely associated with Chris Morgenroth, a native of Germany, an early Bogachlel River settler, and one of the first Forest Service rangers on the Olympic Peninsula. Morgenroth is perhaps most widely remembered for his involvement in the reforestation of a 13,000-acre tract in the Soleduck River drainage that burned in 1907. Just prior to, and after, creation of Olympic National Park in 1938, the cabin served as the guest quarters of prominent government officials, including Secretary of the Interior Harold lckes in 1937, and again in 1941. Documented improvements and changes to the structure and site include replacement of the foundation, re-roofing and interior painting by the CCC around 1935; additional remodeling in 1937; and removal of a nearby garage in the mid 1970s. In 1979 substantial damage to the east wall occurred when a tractor loader broke loose from a trailer navigating a highway curve and struck the building. This incident prompted a concerted Park Service effort to dispose of the building. In 1982 the Storm King Guard Station was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. January and February 1984 saw the careful disassemble of the building for storage and future reassembling. Rectangular plan; measures approx. 30' x 26'; 1 1/2 stories; horizontal cross-notched log structure; steep gable with cedar shingle roof material; post and pier foundation; 2, north-facing gable roof dormers with paired, fixed 'sash windows. The lower floor has double-hung sash windows; shed roof over north-facing porch and a shake enclosed rear addition, door removed; slate stone fireplace; interior walls, knotty cedar; tongue and groove flooring. Alterations: remodeled in 1937; recent addition centered on west wall; damage to east wall and stone chimney in 1979. Siting: in wooded area at sharp bend in the highway; approx. 5 yards from the shore of Lake Crescent.

SIGNIFICANCE Storm King Guard Station (Morgenroth Cabin) was determined eligible for nomination to the National Register by the Keeper of the National Register in December 1981. The Storm King Guard Station is significant for its associations with inhabitant Chris Morgenroth, an early homesteader and forest ranger on the Olympic Peninsula. Morgenroth was instrumental in the development of Olympic National Forest, the conservation of old growth timber, the promotion of the pulpwood industry on the Olympic Peninsula, and the establishment of Olympic National Park. Constructed around 1905, the Storm King Guard Station may be the oldest extant building in the Lake Crescent area and is one of the oldest remaining structures dating from the early period of Federal administration of land presently within Olympic National Park. Although some interior changes may have occurred during the building's remodeling in 1937, the Morgenroth Cabin remains an excellent example of early north peninsula log construction. It retains substantial integrity of design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.





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SOLEDUCK RANGER STATION



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Soleduck Ranger Station spacer Soleduck Ranger Station


From "Historic Building Inventory Olympic National Park Washington" by Gail E. H. Evans

Constructed in 1936 by the U.S. Forest Service, the present Soleduck Ranger Station Residence was originally known as the Eagle Guard Station Residence. Following the establishment of Olympic National Park in 1938, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) working at a side camp just north of the ranger station, completed some stonework and landscaping at the guard station. In addition, the CCC provided labor to construct the powerhouse and lighting plant (the generator house) around 1940, a few feet behind the guard station. This structure is one of numerous administrative buildings constructed by the U.S. Forest Service on the Olympic Peninsula. Beginning in 1905 the Forest Service gained jurisdiction of nearly 1.5 million acres of prime timberland on the peninsula, then included in the Olympic Forest Reserve. During the next thirty-three years, a network of administrative structures facilitating the forest rangers and guards (seasonal assistants) in patrolling this immense territory, evolved. Ranger stations, usually erected at more accessible front country sites, and guard stations, typically built at back country locations only reached by trail, played an important role in the Forest Service's efforts to pursue its multiple resource land use policy. Before 1911 only a few ranger and guard stations were built (including Storm King, Interrorem, and Louella). But as the ranks of forest personnel swelled, and trails were built into the rugged interior, more stations were added. Often these ranger and guard stations consisted of living/sleeping quarters, a fire cache, and a tool/wood shed, a shelter, and sometimes a horse barn and corral. With the arrival of the CCC on the peninsula in the 1930s, Forest Service-administered lands witnessed a great boom in fire prevention and recreation development. The construction of Forest Service ranger and guard stations reached epoch proportions. By the end of the 1930s no fewer than twelve ranger stations and nearly thirty guard stations stood in existence on the Olympic Peninsula. Many of these 1930s Forest Service-built administrative buildings embodied physical characteristics reflecting the Rustic Style, a style that advocated employing designs, materials, and sitings that were closely integrated with the surrounding landscape. The pine tree symbol, identified with both the Forest Service and the CCC, became widely used during the 1930s. With the creation of Olympic National Park in 1938 and the gradual introduction of air surveillance in fire management following World War II, ranger and guard station construction subsided. More recently many existing structures have been demolished. In 1984 only four Forest Service ranger stations and eight guard stations are extant on the Olympic Peninsula.

The Eagle Guard Station is one of five guard stations now standing in Olympic National Park.

Irregular in shape; main block measures 24' x 28'; 1 1/2 stories with rear 1 story addition measuring 16' x 19'6"; wood-frame wall construction sheathed with wood shakes; gable roof over main block of building with cross gable extending to the east; poured concrete foundation (main block); concrete slab (rear addition); 6-over-6, double-hung sash, and multi-light fixed sash windows; wood shutters with decorative evergreen tree cut in wood. Alterations: possible addition at rear prior to 1952; front porch added.

Setting: located on small, shaded knoll with gravel driveway on north side. It is approx. 10' from Upper Soleduck River Road, and 15' from garage building (173).

SIGNIFICANCE

The Eagle Guard Station, consisting of a residence, garage, and generator house, is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. In 1984, all three buildings are nearly fifty years old. As a building group, the Eagle Guard Station represents well a period of fire protection and recreational development by the U.S. Forest Service on the Olympic Peninsula. These three buildings are among numerous Forest Service structures constructed during the 1930s that served as residence quarters for Forest Service guards. Although many 1930s' Forest Service ranger and guard stations (such as the Elwha, Jackson and North Fork Quinault stations), typically had generator houses associated with the station complex, that were stylistically similar to the one at this guard station, Eagle Guard Station has the only extant and intact generator house presently in the park. In addition, the Eagle Guard Station is one of very little extant Forest Service built guard stations that retains its physical integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.



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MINK LAKE SHELTER



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MINK LAKE SHELTER

MINK LAKE SHELTER - 1997
Mink Lake Shelter - 1997
Posted by RodF on NWHikers.net
spacer MINK LAKE SHELTER - 2006
Mink Lake Shelter - 2006
Posted by Tinman on NWHikers.net


Information from : http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/summary.asp

The Mink Lake Shelter is individually eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

It is one of only five remaining shelters within Olympic National Park representing the final program of shelter construction. Mink Lake shelter exemplifies the continuing National Park Service commitment to providing recreational trailside shelters at popular backcountry locations. The structure retains integrity of design, location, materials, and workmanship.

 
Physical Event
Begin Year
Begin Year AD/BC
End Year
End Year AD/BC
Designer
Designer Occupation
1. 
Built
1964
AD
1964
AD
National Park Service
Other
2. 
Preserved
2009
AD


OLYMNPS
Other


 
Structural Component(s)
Material(s)
1. 
Walls
Logs
2. 
Roof
Shake


Short Physical Description:

The Mink Lake shelter is a three-sided structure measuring roughly 14 wide by 14 deep.

Long Physical Description:

The wall and sill logs average 11 in diameter and rest on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 6 x2 in height, while the front opening was seven feet, and a ridge of 9. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 10 diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof purlin. Five rows of rafters support nine boards for the shake roof. The gable roof has a long slope to the back, and a short overhang at the front. The shingles are 42 long. The lower sections of the three exterior walls consist of vertical log slabs supported by a round log sill. The log slabs rise to the height of the back wall on all three sides. The gable end walls are then constructed of stacked 6 x 6 sawn timbers, trimmed to form the slope.




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