SOUTHWEST DESTINATIONS - QUEETS RIVER TRAIL...16.2 MILES

CONNECTS TO:
LOWER CROSSING ROUTE
UPPER CROSSING WAY TRAIL
DIRECTIONS TO : QUEETS TRAILHEAD

NEAREST CAMPGROUND: Queets

RANGER STATION : Ranger stations, toilets, water

INFORMATION ABOUT TRAIL :
CURRENT TRAIL CONDITIONS
TRAIL MAP
TRAIL INFORMATION
SAM'S RIVER ROUTE
NPS TRAIL DESCRIPTION
MR. G. SHAUBE - EARLY SETTLER
QUEETS SERVICE FALLS TRIP
DIRECTIONS TO HOT SPRINGS
WESTERN PARK LANDS
KALALOCH BEACH

FISHING OVERVIEW
LOST IN THE WOODS
DAY HIKES
TSHLETSHY CREEK
HIKING WESTERN APPROACHES
SUMMER AT SMITH CABIN
MIKE'S SOLO TREK
QUEETS VALLEY MAP & INFO
QUEETS CANYON - 2005




washout area
PHOTO COURTESY OF Mike MacFerrin (see his solo trek above) shows why road closed - per Mike, "....I reach a "Road Closed" sign, chained across the Matheny Creek bridge roughly 7 miles in.....This partial washout was over 50 feet above the river, still churning below. A surveyer I met estimated it'd cost $30K to fix. No one is sure whether the Park Service intends to ever fix it at all. No longer held in place by flora, the rest of the road is quickly eroding straight into the river."

CLICK HERE FOR MOST CURRENT INFO ABOUT ROAD CLOSURE.

DIFFERENT COMMENTS ABOUT TRAIL ....

....On the Olympic Peninsula, the best examples of temperate rain forest are found in four major drainages of the Hoh, Bogachiel, Queets and Quinault rivers, said Ken Eldredge....

PER SEATTLEPI....For old forests on the west side, a personal favorite is the Queets River Trail, with big hemlock and fir on the surrounding hills. Just more than two miles in is a huge Douglas fir, 14 1/2 feet thick at the base, once believed to be the world's largest...

....Some say this is the best rain forest trail. But it starts out tough: hikers have to ford the Queets River at the beginning of the trail, which discourages many hikers.


A SHORTER VERSION....The Sams River Loop Trail is three miles in length and can be started at the Queets Ranger Station or the trailhead one mile east of the station. The trail passes both the Queets and Sams Rivers as well as through former homestead meadows. Elk are often seen early morning or late evening in the meadows....


ABOUT FISHING....The Queets River, another glacial river to the south of the Hoh, also begins in the heart of the Olympics, and is very much like the Hoh in appearance. There is a road that parallels the river from near the crossing on Hwy. 101 and extends upstream to the Queets Campground 13 miles distant. There are several places along this road providing good bank access. In addition, from the road's end at the campground, a trail crosses the river and continues to follow the river. During periods of low water this can take the walking angler to some great steelhead holes that are virtually untouched....

river photo

HISTORY ( from Elder Bob ) .....The Shaube/Smith Place is about 5 miles up the Queets Trail, near the junction of Tshletshy Creek. Hikers go past what use to be the largest Douglas Fir in the World. It lost its top in a wind storm and now a fir in British Columbia is the largest one.

George A. Shaube and his family first settled on the Shaube/Smith Cabin site, in the early 1920s. The Shaube Cabin, part of the existing building, was constructed in either 1922, or 1923. (The date "1923" is on the front door.) With the founding of the Evergreen colony in 1890, pioneer homestead claims were established at regular intervals for a twenty-mile stretch of the winding Queets flood plain, between the 1890s and the 1920s. Lack of road access up the Queets Valley until the late 1920s necessitated a subsistence agrarian lifestyle for early Queets residents. George Shaube was among the last individuals to settle in the Queets River community, and his homestead was the furthest upriver. The Shaube family remained on their homestead until 1929, at which time they moved downstream to the present Killea (Queets) Ranger Station (Located 1/4 mile west of the present location). Prior to 1929, The-National Forest Service used the Shaube Cabin as a guard station at certain times of the year.


Mr. Shaube was responsible for locating or directing trail construction in much river and creek drainage on the southern slopes of the Olympics. These included trails leading up the Queets and Salmon Rivers, along the Tshletshy, Matheny, and Pelton Creeks, between Pelton Creek and the head of Alta Creek, and along Harlow and State Creeks' which drain into the south fork of the Hoh River.

Oscar Smith purchased the Shaube property in 1929 and presumably pursued cattle raising on the property. Smith built a major addition to the Shaube Cabin in 1929.

AND FINALLY....

We spent a couple of days in Queets rain forest on the Olympic Peninsula. It's a mysterious, spongy place, full of moss and frogs and silently rotting wood. It's hard to believe it's real and now, and not a reconstructed ecosystem from some primeval age of ooze.....



I childproofed my home...but they still manage to get in. spacer Elder Bob's site button


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