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Laura Silvey relates:

"I came West in March, 1901, with Orpha who was two years old. Charley Sargent, who was living in Aberdeen at the time met me at the depot. Brother Ed was in Hoquiam waiting for me. We took the stage to Humptulips. A bunch of noisy loggers were returning to camp. Their language was very rough. Mr Evans stopped the stage and reminded them that there was a lady aboard and that if they couldn't be quiet they could get off and walk. At the Humptulips River I noticed the basket bridge.

Brother Ed helped me prove up on a 40-acre timber claim, six miles north of Humptulips in "21-10". I lived with him near Murhard's. Then we moved to the Sargent place, across the river. The first time I saw Ernest Paull, then 21 years of age, I said, "Gosh, he's cute. In 1904, I married him."



THE EVANS FAMILY

By Harry C. Evans, (1934)


My maternal grandfather Burch brought his family to London, Canada over a hundred years ago. However, since my mother was a babe of three months, she was left behind to be reared by her aunts. Eventually she married, but was left a widow with one child.

My father, Thomas Evans, was born in Canterbury, England. He met and married Sarah Elizabeh Burch and they became parents of fifteen children - making sixteen for my mother.

I, Harry Charles Evans, was born on May 24, 1854, in Dover England, attending school there. As a lad I worked with my father who was a shoe maker by trade. Later I followed the sea, working on boats which plyed between England and Scotland.

Being of a roving and adventurous nature I decided at the age of eighteen to see more of the world. Took passage on a full-rigged ship, ' the Alexander Marshall', belonging to the Black Bail Line. We left Liverpool Nov. 5, 1872, and reached New York on Christmas Day, after a very rough and exciting trip, seeing many wrecks on the passage over. I remained only a few weeks in New York City, returning home on the "Denmark" a steamer belonging to the National Steamship Company. Landed at the Victoria docks at London, after an uneventful trip.

 I