V.2.19
Period IV: Compact Shelters - 1941 to 1951


General Description:

To address the increase of national recreational activity following World War II in the late 1940's and early 1950's the National Park Service planned and constructed the first design variation of a new generation of trailside shelters. There are only three extant shelters that represent this period.

By late 1948, plans for new trailside shelters had been completed and materials placed on order. In September 1949, two new shelters had been constructed at Lake Angeles and two at Glacier Meadows. These new shelters were much simpler, smaller, and lower in profile than the older Forest Service shelters. The public reaction was very favorable: "Compact and rugged as their surroundings." "Privacy for small groups appreciated." "Better than the larger type shelters." "Best seen on tour of U.S." The following month a shelter was completed at Lunch Lake (Seven Lakes Basin) and a replacement shelter started at Sol Duc Park.

These new shelters were a radical change from previous shelter design. Nearly a third smaller in floor area than the older Forest Service shelters and half the size of the elaborate rustic shelters erected by the CCC at Soleduck Falls (Canyon Creek), the shelters consisted of a simple three-sided log lean-to, with a shallow shed roof and dirt floor. They were minimal in nature, less intrusive to the landscape, and designed for recreational use. NPS hoped that the solid log walls would reduce the vandalism of the shake-covered sidewalls that had plagued many of the early Forest Service shelters. These compact, modest structures were located at popular camping locations to serve the ever-increasing number of backcountry visitors.

These shelters represent a specific management period in the Park history that sought to provide trail shelters at popular backcountry locations, often in pairs. At the same time, the design sought to be more durable and require less maintenance, more compact in character for small hiking parties, and less visible on the landscape.

V.2.20
Blue Glacier #1 Shelter

(Lower Shelter)

Introduction:

Blue Glacier Shelter # 1 was constructed in the fall of 1949 as one of the first of the new, compact shelters.

General:

The Blue Glacier Shelter #1 is a three-sided solid log structure measuring 10'-6" wide x 11' deep. The wall and sill logs measured 10" in diameter and rested on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 3'-6" feet in height, while the front opening was six feet. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 6" diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof beam. Four 5" purlins spanned front to back along the slope of the roof. Eight 2" x 4" shake nailer boards crossed the purlins at 10" on center and were covered with 24" long sawn shingles.

The shelter suffered extensive damage from weather and was repaired during 2008.

Period 4

Period 4

Figure No. 1: Blue Glacier #1 Shelter following repairs, 2008.


V.2.21
Blue Glacier #2 Shelter

(Upper Shelter)

Introduction:

Blue Glacier Shelter # 2 was constructed in the fall of 1949.

Period 4

Figure No. 1: Blue Glacier #2 Shelter, July 2004.

General:

The Blue Glacier Shelter #2 is a three-sided solid log structure measuring roughly 10'-6" wide x 11' deep. The wall and sill logs measured 10" in diameter and rested on individual stone footings. The rear wall was only 3'-6" feet in height, while the front opening was six feet. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 6" diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front roof beam. Four 5" purlins spanned front to back along the slope of the roof. Eight 2" x 4" shake nailer boards crossed the purlins at 10" on center and were covered with 24" long sawn cedar shingles.

The shelter suffered extensive damage from weather in 2008 and is scheduled for repairs in the summer of 2009.


V.2.22
Wilder Shelter


Introduction:

Wilder Shelter is located on the upper reaches of the Elwha River near the mouth of Leitha Creek, roughly about 18 miles from the Whiskey Bend trailhead . It was last evaluated in August 2006.

Wilder Shelter is nearly identical to the two Blue Glacier shelter built during this period. It is a three-sided solid log structure measuring roughly 12' x 12'. The wall and sill logs measure 10" in diameter and rest on individual stone footings. The rear wall is only 4 feet in height, while the front opening is six feet ten inches. The open end of the side walls were stabilized by a pair of vertical 6" diameter logs, which in turn also supported the front 5" roof beam. Four 5" rafters spanned front to back along the slope of the roof. Eight 3" shake nailer poles crossed the rafters and were covered with 20" long hand-split cedar shakes. The floor is dirt and there are no bunks.

Period 4

Figure No. 1: Wilder Shelter, August 2006.

The shelter maintenance files of 1970 record 4 bunks in the shelter and the surveys of 1974 and 1980 both list the shelter to be in excellent/good condition. Presently, the shelter is in very poor condition and needs total reconstruction.

Site:
  • (See General observations)

    Recommendation:

    Regrading of site for moisture management and sill log exposure required. Site vegetation should be cleared. The grade has grown with vegetation to the point that the stone footings for the sill logs are completely below grade.

Period 4

Figure No. 2: Wilder Shelter, August 2006.
Log Walls:
  • The 10" diameter sill logs are completely deteriorated on all sides of the shelter. The wall logs are also in very poor condition. All of the wall logs are deteriorated at the back corners, meaning every log in the structure will require replacement. The four front vertical log are all deteriorated at their base.

    Recommendation:

    Replace all sill and wall logs.
    Replace the four vertical logs that stabilize the front ends of the sidewalls.

Period 4

Figure No. 3: Wilder Shelter, August 2006.
Roof:
  • The roof is also in poor condition. The four rafters are deteriorated along the back wall, as are most of the shake nailer poles. The cedar shakes are heavily covered with moss and there are signs of leakage throughout the entire interior.

    Recommendation:
  • The roof structure and shakes require complete replacement

Period 4

Figure No. 4: Wilder Shelter, August 2006; the interior shows no sign of the four bunks records indicate to have been in the shelter in 1970.

Interior:
  • There is no sign of the four bunks noted in the 1970 survey. Verify if the shelter is in a heavy snow location; if so, some additional interior support is recommended. The restoration of the bunks would provide both lateral and gravity support for the roof and walls.

    Recommendation:

    Restore the four bunks to the shelter.



Period 3 spacer Table of Contents spacer Period 5