PART I - LOG CABIN

FOUNDATION ASSESSMENT

The rotted base logs appear to be fir. By contrast, the well-preserved original footing log on the east end of the kitchen is cedar.

There are two remnant hand-made gutter brackets on the east end of each cabin gable. It appears that a gutter system was in place sometime in the past. At present the run-off from the roof splashes several feet up onto the cabin walls.

The creek below the cabin was diverted in 1905 so as to run past the front of the cabin--which it did for some fifty years. The net effect was the accumulation of silt and forest litter along the north and west side of the cabin. The north side base log lies nearly buried. This excessive soil contact has been a leading contributor to the rotting of the base logs.

Currently the base logs on the west, north and east sides have rotted causing the cabin to list to the north.

Three principal factors have caused the logs to rot:
  • The use of fir logs rather than more rot-resistant cedar logs
  • Rain splash off the roof
  • Soil build up around logs


North Side

2005
NORTH SIDE OF CABIN--BASE LOG LIES HALF-BURIED


FOUNDATION - RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Remove an area of soil parallel to the north side of the cabin, approximately15" deep, 20' long and tapering upslope 10'. This would restore the grade adjoining the cabin and thus minimize ground contact with the base log on this wall. Tapering the cut would be preferable to a trenched removal.
  • Replace-in-kind any logs with cedar logs; logs with suppressed growth --tighter growth rings--would have an even longer lifespan.
  • Remove soil under north end of front porch to fully expose base log W-1 when it is replaced-in-kind.

FLOOR SYSTEM ASSESSMENT

In 1969 the floor was reported as consisting of one-inch planks of random widths and lengths secured to six-inch sleepers resting on the dirt (Koue Report, 1969). The Dalton (1979) report stated that the decking was 1 1/2" x 11"-12" wide. The lengths were 53", 55", and 72". At present no definitive record has been found that reveals what was done to the floor during the restoration of 1970. Swenson (2002) reports that the floor was "repaired".

The current floor, its understructure and decking was installed circa 1994 (Berson, 2005).

The cabin now bears on twelve pier blocks, six per side, each block set in 18" from the edge of the wall. Each set of six piers have shim-blocks on top, supporting a girder 6"x6"x16'-3", placed close to each side wall. These girders in turn support six beams 4"x8"x14' which span the width of the cabin and cantilever out 6" to 10", and which are mortised into side logs, S-2 and N-1. This frame carries the entire weight of the cabin.

To support the floor, 2"x6" joists, approximately 3'-0" in length are hung from the sides of the 4"x8" beams. A sub-floor of 3/4" plywood lays over this. The finished floor consists of 1 1/2" hand-split planks of random widths and 39" in length, secured with galvanized nails. The girders, beams, and joists are all pressure treated lumber. The grade of the plywood is unknown.

Log N-1 is so decayed, especially on its west end, that the cabin has settled 6" in the northwest corner. In turn, log N-2 now bears much of the weight.

A layer of plastic sheeting covers the ground under the cabin.

North Side floor system

2005
FLOOR SYSTEM


FLOOR SYSTEM--RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

The level of the cabin logs is totally dependent on the floor frame being level. The cabin now lists out of plumb which is attributable to the rotting of the base logs. It is also possible that the floor frame is no longer level which, if true, would occur if the bearing area of the piers was inadequate, or, if the piers were not laid on undisturbed mineral soil. To level up the floor frame, repairs to the piers would be necessary but difficult.

Options for restoration include:
  1. Separate the floor frame from the cabin walls by severing the cantilevered portion of the beams; let floor live independently inside cabin. Let the cabin logs once again carry the cabin weight.
  2. If the floor frame is level, restore the cabin level when the rotted base logs are replaced-in-kind, using the previously installed mortise log/support beam system.
  3. If the floor frame is out of level, make level by repairing the piers, then replace-in-kind the base logs that are in turn mortised to rest on the beams.
    spacer Options to repair the piers include:
    • Improve the bearing area of the piers by insuring they are on undisturbed mineral soil
    • Improve the bearing area of the piers by pouring broad footings under each pier
    • Install more piers to further distribute the load

CABIN WALL LOG ASSESSMENT

The only known replacement-in-kind of the logs occurred in 1970, though currently no written record of which logs were replaced has been found.

The cabin walls no longer fully bear on the base logs. A new floor system was installed circa 1994 (Berson, 2005) which transfers the load to hidden piers and beams that are mortised into S-2 and N-1 (See Floor Detail). Prior to this, the bearing wall logs had been the two gable-end logs and the south side-wall log. (The south wall has one more log than the north wall and functioned as a bearing wall).

The cabin wall logs are generally in fair condition, though some logs are rotting and need patching and some logs are fully rotted and need replacing-in-kind.

For this assessment each log was inspected for condition and to ascertain its origin. Field notes and drawings were made and each log was given an identifying code, i.e., W-1 for base log on the west wall, N-13 being topmost on the north wall, etc. Log sizes were described by the approximate diameters of the ends and their length, as viewed from outside the cabin. For example, 12" x11" x15'-0" indicates a log with a 12" diameter on the left as viewed, tapering to 11" on the right end and is 15'- 0" long.

Original Logs when inspected showed some or all of the following features:
  • Patterns of knots and notch shapes consistent with pre-1970 photos
  • Corner joinery that indicated that a sharp axe was used
  • Beveling on the inside faces of the corners
  • Kerf marks made with a cross-cut saw in the joints and on the log ends
  • Higher survival rate as consistent with the better protection afforded on the gable ends, and under porches--as opposed to the exposure to moisture found on side walls
  • Higher survival rates consistent with the better protection afforded by being higher up the sidewalls beyond rain splash and soil contact
Not-Original Logs-(replaced-in kind in 1970), when inspected showed some or all of the following features:
  • Patterns of knots and notch shapes inconsistent with pre-1970 photos
  • Corner joinery made with a dull axe and chainsaw
  • Lack of beveling on the inside faces of the corners at the corners
  • Kerf marks made with a chainsaw in the joints and on the log ends
  • A position that would be consistent with more exposure to moisture and rot, i.e., on the side walls and on the lowest courses--both places more subject to rain splash and soil contact and subsequently more likely to have a shorter life span

WEST WALL LOGS ASSESSMENT

Originally this wall was built with 18 logs prior to cutting the door opening. The severed logs created another 7 short ones flanking the south side of the doorway, giving the wall a nominal 25 logs. In 1970, 6 logs were replaced-in-kind, leaving 19 original logs.

Earliest photo records show a single casing board over the doorway. Later photos-1940's, show the addition of a casing board on the right side. The 1969 photos show both boards-and no corresponding casing board on the left side of the door. The restoration work in 1970 preserved the two boards of casing appearance. Subsequent to 1970 notches were added to the logs flanking the left side of the doorway. This may have been done to add a third casing board to give the doorway a more "balanced" look. As of 2005, no trim boards are present, only notches indicating where they had been.

North Side floor system

2005
WEST WALL LOGS
SHADED (YELLOW ) LOGS INDICATES REPLACED-IN-KIND IN 1970

W-1 12"x 11"x 15'-2" Estimated dimensions
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and a shorter life-span
  • Door sill is notched into top of log, 3" deep
  • South end is sound and clear of ground for 7'
  • North end is rotted for 8' of its length
W-2 12"x 12"x 9'-11"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and a shorter life-span
  • The original log had no notch adjacent to the door opening and 1970 post-work photos show no notch at that time
  • Sound condition
W-3 12" x 11"x 9'-11"
  • Not original.--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and a shorter life-span, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-4 12"x 11"x 9-10"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-5 9"x 11"x 9'11"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-6 10"x 9"x 9'-9"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-7 8"x 9"x 9'-10"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-8 9"x 8"x 9'-9"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • The right side of the doorframe notched for a casing board, notches present on the logs W-9 through W-15 Sound condition
W-9 12"x12"x 26"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and a shorter life span, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-10 12"x 12"x 25"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-11 11"x 10"x 26"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-12 9"x 10"x 27"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-13 8" x 9" x 26"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-14 9" x 10" x 28"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-15 8" x 8" x 27"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-16 7" x 9" x 14'- 11"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Sound condition
W-17 9" x 8" x 15' -0"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • The original anchor for the top end of the original shed-style porch roof; nail holes in evidence
  • 2' on south end shows discoloration and may have some rot
W-18 through W-25
  • Gable end logs
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery, photo record
  • Secured to two 3" poles inside the cabin that parallel the roof line just under the roof purlins
  • W-24 has nail holes indicating location of original sign "RIVERVIEW" found in photos (1905-1934)
  • Sound, though weathered

WEST WALL LOGS - RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace-in-kind W-1 with a cedar log, estimated to be 12' x 11" x 15' -2"
  • notch doorway to match existing one.
  • Install rock footings under W-1.
  • Remove only the rotten portion of W-17, and splice in a replacement piece. This may require only removing the top third of about 3' of the log, or possibly a full splice as is currently exhibited on the north wall. Use 8" x 8" x 3' - 0" stock.

West End Logs

2005
WEST WALL LOGS
SOLID SHADED AREA INDICATES REPLACED-IN-KIND



EAST WALL LOGS ASSESSMENT - AS VIEWED FROM KITCHEN


Originally this wall was built with 18 logs, prior to cutting the window opening which in turn became a door opening (photographic record). Severing for the door created another 7 logs on the north flank of the doorway, giving the wall a nominal 25 logs. In 1970, 10 logs were wholly replaced-in-kind. Another 7 logs were partially replaced-in-kind, that is, splices were made to replace rotted the portions. With these spliced portions there are nominally 32 logs now in this wall. E-4 through E-11, and E-26 through E-32 are all original. E-1, E-2, E-3, and E-12 through E-25 are all Not Original--installed in 1970.


East End Logs

2005
EAST WALL LOGS
SHADED AREA INDICATES LOGS REPLACED-IN-KIND IN 1970




E-1 10" x 11" x 15' - 1" estimated size
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Provides the threshold in the back door opening
  • Badly rotted, especially on north end
E-2 11" x 11" x 6' - 1"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-3 11" x 10" x 6' - 1"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-4 9" x 10" x 6' - 1"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound, though notch is aging
E-5 11" x 10" x 6' - 1"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound, dove-tail tenon showing some rot
E-6 9" x 9" x 6' - 1"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
E-7 10" x 9" x 6' - 1"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
E-8 8" x 9" x 6' - 1"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
E-9 9" x 9" x 10' - 4"
  • Original segment of splice-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
E-10 8" x 8" x 10' - 4"
  • Original segment of splice-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
E-11 8" x 8" x 10' - 4"
  • Original segment of splice-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
E-12 11" x 10" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-13 11" x 11" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-14 11" x 11" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-15 10" x 10" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-16 10" x 10" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-17 10" x 10" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-18 10" x 10" x 6' - 0"
  • Not original--chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
E-19 8" x 8" x 5' - 5"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
E-20 8" x 8" x 5' - 5"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
E-21 8" x 8" x 5' - 5"
  • Not original - chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
E-22 8" x 8" x 5' - 5"
  • Not original - chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
E-23 8" x 8" x 4' - 6"
  • Not original - chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
E-24 8" x 8" x 2' - 6"
  • Not original - chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
E-25 8" x 8" x 1' - 0"
  • Not original - chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound


EAST WALL LOGS RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace-in-kind log E-1 with a cedar log, estimated to be 10" x 11" x 15' - 1"
  • At the doorway opening on E-1, notch log flat to match front door threshold


East Wall Logs

2005
EAST WALL LOGS
SHADED AREA INDICATES LOG REPLACE-IN-KIND


NORTH WALL LOG ASSESSMENT

Originally this wall was built with 10 logs. A small barn was subsequently built very close to the cabin and it had an eave that nearly met the cabin eave. Consequent litter build-up and roof failures extensively damaged the walls of both buildings (Koue, 1969). In 1970, 7 logs were wholly replaced-in-kind. Three more logs were partially replaced-in-kind, that is, splices were made to replace the rotted portions. With these spliced portions there are nominally 13 logs now in this wall.

North Wall Logs

2005
NORTH WALL LOGS
SHADED AREA INDICATES LOGS REPLACE-IN-KIND IN 1970

N-1 12"x 12"x 18'- 1" estimated
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Rotted and half missing
N-2 12" x 13" x 18' - 1"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Mostly sound, though 4' of west end has soft top, indicating rot
  • See Flooring notes
N-3 10" x 11" x 18' - 1"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span
  • Sound
N-4 9" x 10" x 10' - 0"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
N-5 10" x 10" x 9' - 1"
  • Original segment of splice-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Mostly sound, though aged
N-6 9" x 10" x 10' - 0"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery,
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
N-7 10" x 9" x 9' - 0"
  • Original segment of splice-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Mostly sound, some veneer of weathered wood
N-8 10" x 10" x 10' - 0"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery
  • Spliced portion
  • Sound
N-9 10" x 10" x 9' - 1"
  • Original segment of splice-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Mostly sound, some veneer of weathered wood; one deep check
N-10 10" x 10" x 18" - 0"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery
  • Sound
N-11 9" x 8" x 18' - 1"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery
  • Sound
N-12 10" x 9" x 18' - 1"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery
  • Sound
N-13 6" x 8" x 20' - 0"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery
  • Sound, though it is often wet from the leaking roof; the east end has some soft area on top.

NORTH WALL LOGS-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace-in-kind Log N-1 with a cedar log. Approximate dimensions: 12" x 12" x 15' - 1"
  • Inspect and Assess Log N-2; west end may need one of four options:
    • Top half spliced rotted area on 4' of west end
    • Full-round splice rotted area on 4' of west end
    • Replace-in-kind entire log
    • Leave undisturbed
  • Inspect and Assess N-13; east end may need one of three options:
    • Leave undisturbed
    • Splice rotted portion of log
    • Replace-in-kind entire log


North Wall Logs

2005
NORTH WALL LOGS
SHADED AREAS INDICATE LOGS TO REPLACE-IN-KIND



SOUTH WALL LOG ASSESMENT

Originally this wall was built with 11 logs. A window opening split two logs so at present there are nominally 13 logs.

In 1970, 6 logs were replaced-in-kind.


South Wall Logs

2005
SOUTH WALL LOGS
SHADED AREAS INDICATE LOGS REPLACED-IN-KIND IN 1970



S-1 Missing entirely. Estimate original was 12" x 12" x 18' - 2"

S-2 12" x 11" x 18' - 2"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span; photo record
  • Rotted through much of log
  • See Flooring notes
S-3 12" x 12" x 18' - 0"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span; photo record
  • Sound
S-4 10" x 10" x 18' - 1"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span; photo record
  • Sound; some large checks
S-5 10" x 11" x 18' - 1"
  • Not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span; photo record
  • 69" cut-out on top of log for window sill
  • Sound; some large checks
S-6 9" x 9" x 7' - 3"
  • Probably not original --chainsaw kerfs, rough joinery, location on wall is prone to more weathering and shorter life span; photo record
  • Sound
S-7 10" x 10" x 7' - 3"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery; photo record
  • May have some rot in west end.
S-8 8" x 11" x 17' - 11"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery; photo record
  • 69" cut-out on bottom of log for window opening
  • Sound
S-9 10" x 10" x 18' - 0"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery; photo record
  • 6 cut-out notches (now plugged with wood), originally for ceiling joists
  • Sound
S-10 8" x 9" x 18' - 0"
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery; photo record
  • Sound
S-11 9" x 7" x 19' - 6" Estimated
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery; attached rafters appeared undisturbed
  • Rotten along top and on projecting ends.
  • East end projection was replaced at some point, perhaps 1970
S-12 No measurements taken
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound
S-13 No measurements taken
  • Original-cross-cut kerfs, finer joinery
  • Sound

SOUTH WALL LOGS-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace-in-kind Log S-1, with cedar, estimated size 12" x 12" x 18' - 2"
  • Replace-in-kind Log S-2, with cedar, 12" x 11" x 18' - 2"
  • See Flooring notes
  • Inspect and assess Log S-7; rot may be developing in west end and may need one of four options:
    • Top half spliced in rotted area
    • Full-round splice in rotted area
    • Replace-in-kind entire log
    • Leave undisturbed
    • Replace-in-kind Log S-11, 9" x 7" x 19" - 6"


South Wall Logs

2005
SOUTH WALL LOGS
SHADED AREAS INDICATE LOGS TO REPLACE-IN-KIND



PURLINS ASSESSMENT

There are currently twelve purlins: one ridge pole, two top log/purlins, and nine other poles. They all appear sound inside the cabin, but the projecting ends are very weathered and rotted. Since they bear on the gable ends with no other support than one pair of pole rafters in the middle, they would be difficult to splice effectively.

The purlin spacing is very awkward for laying out shakes of a uniform length. Some of the courses barely reach their upper purlin of support.

The original layout of purlins has been altered as well as the number of roofing courses. The 1905-1925 photos show four purlins closely grouped on the lower half of each gable and two more purlins spaced much further apart up the gable, for a total of six, plus a ridge purlin carrying the top end of the last course of shakes. Originally there were four courses, now there are five.

Inspection and photo comparisons reveal that one purlin-the south walls top-most log which also serves as a purlin-is very likely the only original purlin remaining, and it is quite rotted. All of the other purlins have been replace-in-kind over the years. And, some have been relocated and left out. The north gable now has only five purlins and the south retains six in much their same location. There are also some small poles pieced over the top of the ridge pole, in effect doubling it. This may have been done to provide more nailing areas for the shakes.

West Wall

2005
WEST WALL
DARK SHADING INDICATES PURLINS TO REPLACE-IN-KIND
OR TO INSPECT AND ASSESS




PURLINS - RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace-in-kind the top of wall/purlin on the south side
  • Replace-in-kind any of the remaining purlins
  • Inspect the top log/purlin on the north side (see note about rot in North Wall Log Assessments, Log N-13)

ROOF SHAKES ASSESSMENT

This might be as much as the fourth or fifth roof in the cabin's history. The main cabin is roofed with split cedar shakes, 32" in length, laid barn style, five courses to each gable. The shakes are quite weathered. The first course on each side lies on the top wall log/purlin and has deteriorated to the point where one log is often wet and is visibly quite rotted and the other (1970 vintage) is sound but often wet. Additionally the first course of shakes projects only 5" in line with the roof pitch beyond the cabin walls, and moisture off the roof is easily blown onto the walls.

ROOF SHAKES-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace the roof shakes and revert to four courses per gable
  • Install three courses of 36" shakes, then a top course of 48" shakes, all laid barn-style with galvanized nails
  • Lay first course on each gable so that it projects at least 8" inches in-line with the roof pitch beyond the cabin wall
  • Lay the top course of the north gable so that it projects 6" beyond the ridge line and over the top of the south side gable.
1905 Roof

1905
ORIGINAL ROOF SHOWING FOUR COURSES OF SHAKES PER GABLE

FRONT PORCH ASSESSMENT


The porch evolved over time and after the restoration of 1970 it is likely that none of the original porch elements remain.

Photographs of the porch reveal:
  • 1905    Simple shed roof was supported by two peeled saplings which were resting on a plank deck. Deck appears to have been random width split planks an estimated 6' in length.
  • 1910    Center pole was added.
  • 1911    Narrow step descended from the porch deck in front of the door area.
  • 1926    Secondary deck covered diverted stream that ran past front porch.
  • 1934    Narrow step was added between porch deck and lower deck, again in front of doorway.
  • 1945    Porch roof was changed to hipped style, with three posts (Crisler photos).
  • 1970    During restoration the porch was completely removed.
  • 1984    Hipped roof was supported by three poles resting on plank deck.

The front porch is currently in poor condition. The deck has settled, pulling the porch away from the cabin. The roof shakes are weathered and the roof framing is dilapidated. Two posts are rotten and one is an alder pole sitting on the ground. The decking is rotten and is made of piecemeal shapes and materials; some are hand-split and planed Douglas fir. The understructure is completely rotten.

FRONT PORCH-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

1906 Roof

1906
ORIGINAL SHED-ROOFED PORCH

ALTERNATIVES:

  1. RECONSTRUCT THE HUMES ERA PORCH: (Preferred Alternative)
    Raze current hipped roofed porch and install a shed roofed porch supported by 3 posts.
    • Install three 12" x 6' - 0" cedar log sills perpendicular to the cabin front.
    • Install three 6" x 15' - 0" cedar pole joists parallel to cabin front.
    • Install 1.5" x 8" - 12" random width x 6' - 4" split cedar deck boards, that have been edge trimmed and adzed to a fairly uniform surface; if cedar is not available then substitute Douglas fir.
    • Install three 5" x 6' - 0" cedar poles as posts (Adjust porch roof height clearance to approximate doorway height).
    • Install one 4" x 15' - 0" pole at gable edge.
    • Install one 4" x 15' - 0" pole against cabin on Log W-17.
    • Install four 3" x 9' - 0" pole rafters.
    • Install four 3" x 15' - 6" pole purlins.
    • Install three courses of 36" hand split cedar shakes, laid barn-style.
    • Extend bottom course of shakes beyond purlin 6-8".
  2. RECONSTRUCT THE CRISLER ERA PORCH (Second Alternative)
    Raze the current porch and install a hipped roof porch supported by 3 posts.
    • Install three 12" x 6' - 0" cedar log sills perpendicular to the cabin front
    • Install three 6" x 15' - 0" cedar pole joists parallel to cabin front
    • Install 1.5" x 6' - 4" random width split cedar deck boards, that have been edge trimmed and adzed for a fairly uniform surface.
    • Install three 5" x 6' 4" cedar poles as posts
    • Install one 4" x 15' - 0" cedar pole at front gable edge
    • Install two 4" x 6' - 3" cedar poles at edges of gable
    • Install two side rafters 3" x 5' - 0"
    • Install two hip rafters 3" x 8' - 0"
    • Install three middle rafters 3" x 7' - 0"
    • Install two 3" x 34" side purlins
    • Install one 3" x 6' - 2" purlin
    • Install one 3" x 7' 11" purlin
    • Install one 3" x 10' - 0" purlin
    • Install one 3" x 13' - 0" purlin
    • Install three courses of 36" shakes, laid barn style
    • Extend bottom course of shakes beyond purlin 6 - 8"


2005 Roof

2005
HIPPED-ROOF PORCH




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