PART III - LANDSCAPE

CABIN SITE ASSESSMENT

The cabin sits on the very edge of a bench with the back porch dropping out into a ravine. Shortly after the cabin's construction in 1905, the hillside and lower bench were completely cleared of trees and the view remained clear for the next fifty years. Since the 1950's, the forest has re-established itself with alders, maples and firs. Grant Humes installed a sign in 1905 on the front of the cabin that said RIVERVIEW. There is now no vista of the field below or river. The structure is now very overshadowed by trees, on the south and east sides. The closeness of the trees contributes a great deal of leaf litter onto the roof. The shade is such that the cabin remains in a damp condition much of the year.

Cuttings from the apple tree at the southwest corner of the porch were taken in March, 2005. Matt Albright, ONP greenhouse operator, will attempt to clone the historic apple tree to preserve the stock.

CABIN SITE-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Prune overhanging limbs and remove some trees to minimize the damage from leaf litter
  • Do not remove any fruit trees, especially the apple tree at the corner of the front porch
  • Take hardwood cuttings from remaining fruit trees, during dormant period, to save for cloning purposes


Rotting Roof

2005
ROTTING ROOF

spacer Apple Tree

2005
APPLE TREE BY PORCH



WAGON ROAD ASSESSMENT

A wagon road was built during the Humes occupation to provide access between the upper and lower pastures. A bridge wide enough to accommodate the wagon spanned the creek below the house. In 1969, a volunteer group was directed to build a short, very steep trail from the upper pasture to the lower pasture. Since that date the wagon road has been occasionally maintained. At present the road cut is evident. Many windfalls block the road and the bridge has fallen into the creek.

Wagon Road

2005
LOWER END OF WAGON ROAD


WAGON ROAD-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Remove the windfalls from the roadway
  • Retain the junction with the short-cut trail
  • Improve the approaches of the creek crossing, maintaining it as a ford

TRAIL ASSESSMENT

The trail system at the ranch can be broken into two areas-the lower pasture and the upper pasture.

The lower pasture has had a network of trails involving routes used by elk, stock, and humans. At the east end of the pasture is a trail through the forest to Idaho Creek. As it approaches Idaho Creek it enters an area that has been eroding for forty years. Because of this constant erosion the trail, the Idaho creek crossing, and the connecting route to the Long Ridge trail has had to be relocated many times.

The upper pasture retains its original pattern of trail use, as evidenced by period photos.

The segment from the cabin/wagon road junction and westward enters a very wet area of some several hundred feet across. A small stream entering on the north side of the meadow becomes very braided as it travels across the meadow. Grazing elk have blocked the original channel through their trampling. The condition of this part of the trail has greatly deteriorated and is muddy year round.

TRAIL-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Restore the trail tread to a dry safe condition in the small pasture
  • Re-establish the channel for the small stream, so it crosses the trail at one easily bridged point.

PASTURES ASSESSMENT

The upper and lower pastures were cleared of trees and stumps during the Humes occupation. Stumps were removed by burning, blasting and winch. Fences were erected to corral livestock in both pastures, and gates were built where the Elwha trail entered and exited the ranch. Also during the Humes occupation gardens were planted and fenced in the lower pasture and perhaps the upper pasture.

The Humeses also constructed a large barn in the lower pasture. When the Crislers occupied the ranch they planted and fenced a large garden in front of the cabin on the upper pasture. They later built a greenhouse with concrete footing on the edge of this garden.

The barn, fencing and gates were removed by the SCP in 1958. There has been incursion of some deciduous trees around the perimeter of the fields, notably a maple that now grows out of the foundation of the greenhouse. Likewise, conifers have been encroaching on the east and west ends of the large pasture and along the south side of the small pasture.

PASTURES-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Remove encroaching small conifers on the east and west ends of the large pasture
  • Remove encroaching small conifers along the south side of the small pasture
Lower Pasture

2005
WEST END OF LOWER PASTURE
Trail at center; wagon road to right




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