PART II - KITCHEN ADDITION

DESCRIPTION AND GENERAL CONDITION


The kitchen was built in 1911 (Humes Letters; Humes photo). It is a pole and shakes structure attached to the log cabin. The kitchen is 15' - 0" in width and 10' - 7" in length. The gable over the kitchen is similar but lower than that over the log section and extends over the rear porch the width of the cabin. Reports (Dalton, 1979; Koue, 1969) and existing nails on the rim joist indicate that it once was planked. It now has a dirt floor. It is in fair condition but unstable. The roof is quite weathered. The frame is generally sound and much of it appears original. The siding is in good condition but most is not original. The planked flooring is gone. The porch once had a deck approximately 6' - 0" x 15'; the current decking is 3' - 0" x 15' - 0" though the roof still has the original extension.

There is one door of milled rough-cut lumber 2' - 10" by 6' - 0" which opens onto the rear porch. There are three window openings: 3' - 2" wide by 2' - 1" high in the north wall, 4' - 10" wide by 2' - 10" high in the east wall, and 2' 11" wide by 2' - 0" high in the south wall.

2005 Kitchen Addition

2005
KITCHEN ADDITION

FOUNDATION ASSESSMENT

The foundation consists of three sill logs sitting on soil and rocks.

East Sill (gable end) 12" x 12" x 15' - 0"
  • Original-adze marks, multitude of old nails on several faces
  • Sound--red cedar log
North Sill (side) 8" x 8" x 10' - 5"
  • May not be original-general appearance
  • Half-buried and rotting-fir log (?)
South Sill (side) 8" x 8" x 10' - 0"
  • Possibly original-adzed top; general appearance
  • Partly buried, appears to still be sound
East Kitchen Wall spacer East Kitchen Wall spacer East Kitchen Wall

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EAST KITCHEN WALL



North Kitchen Wall

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NORTH KITCHEN WALL

spacer South Kitchen Wall

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SOUTH KITCHEN WALL

FOUNDATION-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Replace-in-kind North Sill with an 8" x 8" x 10' - 5" red cedar log
  • Inspect and assess South Sill (unbury to inspect)
  • Replace-in-kind as necessary with an 8" x 8" x 10' - 0" red cedar log
  • Remove soil along exterior and interior faces of logs to minimize soil contact

FLOOR SYSTEM ASSESSMENT

The Dalton (1979) report states that the floor was 1.25" hand-split, trimmed and planed cedar or fir. The planks were 40" to 43" long. The Koue report (1969) states the cabin floor as "consisting of one-inch plank of random width and length secured to six-inch puncheon sleepers resting on earth", yet mentions no floor features in the kitchen. However, it does display one photo showing planks in the kitchen that appear similar to the ones in the cabin. The original east footing log has remnant nails from floor planking. Today there is only a dirt floor.

Cabin Floor

2005
CABIN FLOOR
(NOTE UNEVEN SURFACE)


FLOOR SYSTEM-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT


Restore the appearance of the original kitchen floor. Install a floor system independent of the cabin and kitchen walls. The understructure will be hidden and the decking will be replicated with the following:
  • Install nine concrete piers in a 3 x 3 grid.
  • Install three 6" x 6" x 15' pressure-treated beams parallel to the gable ends.
  • Install 1.5" x 6" to 10" by 42" hand-split cedar/Douglas fir planks, securing with bright common nails, trimming each plank to insure a relatively even surface.
  • Install floor system to a height slightly lower than the door thresholds to insure proper door swing clearance.

POLE FRAMING ASSESSMENT

Much of the framing appears to be original (Koue report, photos), as attested to by rusted nail heads, hand-saw kerfing, smoke-darkened surface. This would include corner posts, top plates, east gable end framing and many of the rafters. Some wall members are brighter in appearance and show chainsaw marks indicating they were replaced in/or since 1970. A photo taken in 1911 also shows a four-paned window in the cabin wall that coincides with the current doorway to the kitchen.



Kitchen Framing 1
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KITCHEN FRAMING



Kitchen Framing 3
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KITCHEN FRAMING



The framing is fair condition and no repairs are currently needed.

EAST WALL FRAMING
  • Two posts spacer 3.5" x 6' - 5"
  • Two posts spacer 3.5" x 9' - 7"
  • One top plate spacer 3" x 15' - 0"
  • Nine wall purlins
    • Six 3" x 4' - 10" spacer Beside south side of window
    • Two 3" x 17" spacer Beside north side of window
    • One 3" x 4' - 6" spacer Over door

  • Window R.O. 58" W x 34" H
NORTH WALL FRAMING
  • Four posts spacer 3.5" x 6' - 5"
  • One top plate spacer 3.5" x 10' - 0"
  • Seven wall purlins spacer 3" x 36" - 39"
  • Window R.O. spacer 38" W x 25" H
SOUTH WALL FRAMING
  • Four posts spacer 3.5" x 6' - 5"
  • One top plate spacer 3.5" x 10' - 3"
  • Four wall purlins spacer 3" x 33"
    spacer 3" x 34"
    spacer 3" x 35"
    spacer 3" x 43"
  • Window R.O. spacer 38" W x 25" H

WALL FRAMING-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Inspect and assess for any rot or damage not observed at this time

CEILING TIE-JOISTS ASSESSMENT

There are three tie-joists 3.5" x 15' - 0" long. One is nailed to rafters against cabin wall, another mid-room, and one is nailed to the east gable framing. They are all in fair condition and need no repairs at this time.

CEILING TIE-JOIST RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Inspect and assess for any rot or damage not observed at this time

RAFTERS ASSESSMENT

There are twelve rafters total, six per gable. Each is 3.5" x 10' - 0". Eleven rafters have smoked surface, old nails, insulators, and finer notching that implies Humes or Crisler era work. One rafter in the northwest corner adjacent to the cabin may be from 1970. They are all in fair condition and need no repair at this time.

RAFTERS-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Inspect and assess for any rot or damage not observed at this time

PURLINS ASSESSMENT

The1911 photo of the kitchen under construction shows roof purlins extending only two feet beyond the east kitchen wall. The present purlins deceptively appear to run the full length of kitchen plus the porch. Closer inspection shows them to be original kitchen purlins installed on 36" centers. These have extensions mated to their east end that extend the roof line an additional (approximately) 5'. However, there are some additional purlins that are a full 16' long that are sistered in between the others. These likely were installed to accommodate 32" shakes. There are 14 purlins each 3" x 16' - 0" long. Many appear sound except for the weathered east ends. Of the two parallel ridge purlins the top one looks newer. On many the east ends are rotted back 8" or more. Six purlins have splices out over the porch area.
Back Porch 1
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2005
BACK PORCH

PURLINS - RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Inspect and assess all purlins
  • Cut back weathered ends and replace-in-kind with extensions of cedar peeled poles

ROOF SHAKES ASSESSMENT

The current roof has four courses of shakes per gable, laid barn-style, each shake being 32" in length. The roof area is approximately 400 square feet. This may be the fourth or fifth roof in its existence.

ROOF SHAKES-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

  • Restore the original 36" shake length
  • Install four courses of shakes per gable, laid barn-style, using galvanized nails
  • Install the top course of the north gable so that it extends 6" beyond the ridge line to cover the top course on the south gable
Kitchen Addition

2005
KITCHEN ADDITION

EXTERIOR WALL SHEATHING ASSESSMENT

The original wall sheathing is shown in several photos (Crisler and Humes collections). Photos of the side walls of the kitchen show the original siding to be hand-split boards, 1.5" x 6" to 10" wide x 7' long. The current gable end above the eave line has original boards. They are hand-split, 1.5: x 6" - 10" wide and of various lengths. The edges were hand-planed so that the joinery is tight. The species appears to be Douglas fir. The interior face has remnants of brown building paper and some battens indicating that a papered wall surface had at one time existed, likely to slow air infiltration. A 1936 photo shows no casing around south side window.

The current wall sheathing is a mix of original and non-original hand-split boards. The current non-original side wall sheathing was installed possibly in 1970 or in 1980. It is broken into two courses, lapped, each shake being approximately 42" long (it formerly was sided with 7' pieces). The siding below the eave line on the gable end (non-original) is also in two courses, each about 42" long and butt-jointed. Unlike the original work all the replacement sheathing has galvanized nails, the face thicknesses are not uniform nor the joinery tight. In some cases the gaps between boards are large and crudely made battens cover the gaps.


Exterior Sheathing

2005
EXTERIOR SHEATHING

1936 Kitchen Wall
1936
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2005

SOUTH WALL OF KITCHEN

EXTERIOR WALL SHEATHING-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

The current wall sheathing does not accurately represent the appearance of the original. It lacks the dimensions and the craftsmanship to be consistent with the replacement-in-kind principle. To be fair it does resemble some sheathing applications on the small barn that formerly adjoined the cabin. To restore the wall sheathing to the original appearance:
  • Install 7' hand-split planks, 1.5" x 6" - 10" wide on the side walls and on the end wall below the eave line
  • Install cedar for wall sheathing as substitute for Douglas fir to extend the life of the walls
  • Hand plane the edges for tight fit
  • Attach with bright common nails
  • Do not install casing
  • Do not install battens
  • Install cupboard vent as seen in upper left of 1936 photo

REAR PORCH ASSESSMENT

The rear porch is a framework of posts, railing and decking, none of which appears to be of original material. It is tied in to the kitchen roof purlins which extend six feet beyond the gable end wall, thus covering the porch deck. All of the post and beam material is aged and should be replaced. The deck boards only extend three feet onto the porch and should be replaced, restoring the original five foot deck depth.

The rear porch consists of:
  • Deck Framing
    • 3" x 15' - 0" beam
    • 3" x 3' - 0" end joists
    • 3" braces and short posts
  • Decking, 1.5: x random width x 36" hand-split cedar
  • Porch Posts
    • 5" x 4" x 10' - 2"
    • 5" x 4" x 7' - 8"
  • Gable Cross-tie, 4" x 15' - 0"
  • Hand Rail, south end, 4" x 4' - 10"
  • Eave-edge Plates
    • 4" x 4' - 10"
    • 4" x 4" - 10"
1925 Porch Addition

1925
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2005

PORCH ADDITION

NOTE SHED ROOF EXTENSION IN 1925 PHOTO


REAR PORCH-RECOMMENDED TREATMENT

Given that the porch components are not original and are undersized given their tasks, it's recommended that the scale of posts and beams be increased slightly. To do this:
  • Inspect the top plates to see if they are still functional; if not, replace-in-kind
  • Remove decking, deck framing, posts and east gable-end cross tie
  • Install 4" - 5" short posts, beams, and end joists
  • Install 3" - 4" braces
  • Install 5" x 10' - 6" post on southeast corner
  • Install 5" x 8' - 0" post on northeast corner
  • Install 4" - 5" x 15' - 0" gable cross-tie

DOOR ASSESSMENT

The Door assessment is yet to be completed.

There are three doors in the cabin. The front door and the door to the back porch are rough-cut lumber replicas from 1980. The cabin/kitchen passage door is an original but the 1969 Koue photos show another door in its place, so the presently placed door came from elsewhere in the building or from the small barn next door. The Koue photo of the passage door and a Crisler photo of the back porch door provide cues to their construction. Also, the doors on the Remann Cabin and the Botten Cabin, both built under contract by Grant Humes could provide cues to building appropriate replacement doors.

Field notes were taken for the existing doors.

WINDOW ASSESSMENT

Window assessment is yet to be completed.

There are four window openings in the Humes cabin. The log cabin window and the east kitchen wall were both sliders. No sash has survived. There are several photos (Humes and Crisler collections) that can be used as reference. Also, the Remann cabin and the Botten Cabin, both built under contract by Grant Humes, could provide cues to building appropriate replacement windows.

Field notes were taken for the window rough openings



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