Archived from:
http://www.recworld.com/arete/exploring.html

Exploring the Pacific Northwest

 

Accessible Trails on the Olympic Peninsula for Wheelers and Slow Walkers

My Pride Hurricane powered mobility vehicle has once again allowed me to explore trails. The first area I have documented is the Olympic Peninsula. Come back often as I plan to do the same for Washington and the rest of the Pacific Northwest. I also will enhance the accessibility descriptions and add links and photos as I visit each area. I welcome comments and additions from other folks with disabilities and from the manager's of state and federal trails that are contained on this website.

Important: I am using an electric scooter built for outdoor use to rate these trails. You should assess your limitations based on your disability, the type of mobility device you have, and whether anyone will be going on the trail with you to assist if needed. It is always a good idea to contact the agency responsible for managing the trail prior to using it.

Other Links on Accessibility:

Washington State Accessible Outdoor Recreation Guide - An excellent site by Washington State Parks that covers ADA accessible outdoor recreation opportunities, facilities, and trails in the state of Washington.

Olympic National Park Disabled Access - Gorp

Disability Travel and Recreation Resources


Favorite Birding Spots on the Northern Olympic Peninsula

Click on image for larger map

Port Townsend Area

at_work.gif (252 bytes) (map is under construction)

Marrowstone Island

There are several good birding spots on the island: East Beach County Park, Fort Flagler State Park and Mystery Bay State Park. Many different waterfowl such as grebes, loons, Harlequin ducks, and scoters.

Fort Worden State Park

Another large state park that offers a variety of birds in its forested area and on the beach.


Sequim Area


(1)-Gardiner Beach

(2)-Deer Court

(3)-John Wayne Marina

(3)-Sequim Bay State Park

(4)-Port Williams

(5)-Jamestown Road

(6)-Dungeness Bay at 3 Crabs Resturant

(7)-Railroad Bridge Park

(8)-Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

(9)-Dungeness Recreation area and County Park

(1)-Gardiner Beach

This favorite site is located on Discovery Bay, east of Diamond Point. Depending on the season you can see many shore and water birds here such as cormorants, grebes, loons, scoters, oldsquaws, mergansers, and goldeneyes. Adjacent to the beach is a pond that attracts a variety of waterfowl including sanderlings, dowitchers, plovers, and sandpipers. Belted Kingfisher and Great Blue Heron move between the pond and the far side of the road that is a marshy area. The south shore of the pond leads to a forest of fir and alder that attracts raptors such as a Golden Eagle that I saw perched there while on a group birding trip. Several times I have seen Bald Eagles hunting over the "Troll Farm" fields directly west of the site.
[Return to map]

(2)-Deer Court

Public beach access just off of Buck Loop. Walk down to the beach to see a variety of waterfowl.
[Return to map]

(3)-John Wayne Marina

Another place where a variety of waterfowl can be found. North of the Marina is the mudflats of Washington Harbor and directly south is a small area where many water birds can be seen from the road providing good views of birds such as the Yellow-billed Loon and Marbled Murrelet.
[Return to map]

(3)-Sequim Bay State Park

[Return to map]

(4)-Port Williams

Beach park with many chances to see waterfowl.
[Return to map]

(5)-Jamestown Road

There is a Bald Eagle's nest in the tall skags on the north side of the road.
[Return to map]

(6)-Dungeness Bay at 3 Crabs Resturant

This is a favorite birder spot for all kinds of shore and water birds such as Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plovers, Marbold Godwit, and Northern Shrike plus you will see osprey and eagles in the area and on the pilings. Just east of the restaurant there are a several ponds that attract raptors that include not only eagles and osprey, but hawks such as Red-tailed, Peregrine, Sharp-shinned, and Cooper's Hawks. In the winter the ponds offer shelter to pintail, American and Eurasian wigeons, Pintails, and Blue-winged and Green-winged teal. Song birds are prevalent as well.
[Return to map]

(7)-Sequim's Railroad Bridge Park

This site is located on Hendrickson Road at the historic railroad trestle across the Dungeness River. Woodpeckers and a variety of song birds can be seen.
[Return to map]

(8)-Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

The famous Dungeness Spit supports many waterfowl and it is a very popular destination. Here you can see less common birds such as Harlequin ducks, scoters, Oldsquaws, guillemots, murres, and auklets.
[Return to map]

(9)-Dungeness Recreation area and County Park

The area has open fields with shrubs that support hawks including Kestrels and many songbirds.
[Return to map]



Port Angeles Area

at_work.gif (252 bytes) map is still under construction

Hurricane Ridge

Enter the Olympic National Park and drive to to top of Hurricane Ridge. The Visitor center can give you up-to-date information on the many birds in the area.

Ediz Hook

The protected water within the Port Angeles Harbor attract many species of shore birds.



Coastal Area

at_work.gif) map is still under construction

Rialto Beach

This beautiful beach in the Olympic National Park is a great spot to see many ocean birds. Hundreds of Brown Pelicans could be seen this year flying near shore, diving into the water, and grouping along the shore of the river delta near La Push.

Cape Flattery and Neah Bay

Many birds not seen in other areas may be observed here. One of my favorite areas.


Exploring Page
created by Davey Schmidt, dng@olypen.com
last modified: February 10, 1999