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ELDER BOB’S FIELD CAMP PHOTOS - PAGE 3 OF 3


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spacer After we finished our plane table map, we packed up our camp and moved south to the area around Arrow Peak that is east of Pray, Montana and set up our new campsite. We would be doing a geological map of the area around Arrow Peak. Each day we would go out on our own and check out the outcrops. We would take the strike and dip of the beds. Dip is the angle the beds are at in respect to the horizon and strike is the horizontal direction of the beds. We would identify the different formations and mark the location of where one formation changed to another formation. We would map any faults we found. The eastern edge of the area consisted of igneous and metamorphic rocks, so we would stop there. We were learning to map sedimentary formations and not intrusions. From all of the information we gathered, we would be able to make a geological map. A geological map shows four dimensions which are length, width, height and time. We had a topographic map of the area with us and use of aerial photos. I would collect samples of the rocks, mark the location on the map and record my findings in a field notebook. We were mapping the Quadrant, Amsden, Mission Canyon, Lodgepole, Three Forks, Jefferson, Bighorn, Snowy Range, Pilgrim, Park, Meagher and Wosely Formations.

I never was concerned about getting lost in the area. I had a map and compass, and knew how to use them. Even if I did get lost, all I had to do was go downhill and follow the drainage pattern to get to a road in the area. The area was not that remote. If I had headed east, I would have wound up in the Beartooth Mountain Range area. However, there was a main north-south road on that side of the area.

There were many things that I found and did while hiking around the area. One day I came across a dead fawn that had died from natural causes. I found a small spring another day when I was running low on water. In those days, you could drink the water from the streams without having to worry about it being contaminated. Sometimes I would find evidence that prospectors had been in the area. Time went fast and we finally had to halt our mapping. We packed up the camp and went to a cabin owned by a friend of Dr. McMannis to spend a few days completing our map and writing our report. We were allowed to take the information home and type it up formally to send back to Dr. McMannis for our grade for the course.

After returning to Bozeman, I headed back home to Tacoma. On my way I stopped at Lewis and Clark Caverns for a tour through the limestone caverns. We rode a short railroad from the parking lot to the base of the cliff where the caverns were located. Then we rode a cog railroad up the cliff to the mouth of the caverns. From there, I drove to Missoula and stopped to look at the campus for the University of Montana. I was planning on going there for graduate school. I then drove south and took the highway over Lolo Pass on the border between Idaho and Montana. I followed the Clearwater River to Moscow, Idaho. I spent the night there with a schoolmate. Then I drove back across Washington to Tacoma.

spacer Rock outcrop on Arrow Peak.
Limestone outcrop on slope of Arrow Peak.
spacer Steep cliff on Arrow Peak.
Steep cliff on side of Arrow Peak. I did not climb it, but took route up gulch next to it.
spacer Looking up Mill Creek from Arrow Peak.
A view looking up Mill Creek from Arrow Peak.
spacer Castle Rock at base of Arrow Peak.
Another view of Castle Rock at the base of Arrow Peak.
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spacer Cabin near Bozeman.
A cabin near Bozeman that belonged to a friend of Dr. McMannis. We stayed here for the last few days to write our reports and to finish up our geological maps.
spacer Lewis and Clark Cavern.
After the camp was over, I headed back to Tacoma. I stopped at Lewis and Clark Cavern for a tour through it. We rode a rail road from the parking lot to right below the cavern, then a cog rail up the hill to the cavern mouth. Both the railroads are gone now. The cavern was a limestone cavern carved out by dripping water.
spacer Idaho and Montana Border.
I stopped in Missoula to look at the campus for Montana State University because I wanted to go there for graduate school. From there, I went down to Highway 12 to go through Idaho to Moscow. This is the border on Lolo Pass between Idaho and Montana. Road is painted red.
spacer Clearwater River, Idaho.
Highway 12 across Idaho follows the Clearwater River. It was a very pretty drive. I had a blowout of one tire along the road. It was due to just a plain old worn tire.
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spacer Highway along Clearwater River.
A view of the road bed along the river and the rive itself. The interstate between Tacoma and Missoula had not been finished in places, so I made as good as time on this road as I would have on the main highway.
spacer Elder Bobs car back home.
I finally got home on a Sunday before I had to go back to work. This is a photo of my car and all the stuff I took with me. I sort of overdid it on some things, but I was glad I had too much instead of too little.
spacer Elder Bobs first beard.
Another first for me on this trip was growing a beard if you want to call it that. Not much of one, but my mom wanted a photo of it before I shaved.
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