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ELDER BOB’S FIELD CAMP PHOTOS - PAGE 2 OF 3


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spacer We drove to our first campsite up Dry Creek that is just south east of Livingston. We went up an old road to an abandoned homestead and pitched our tents. They looked like teepees. The next two weeks would be spent learning the basics of field geology and doing a plane table map of the nose of a plunging anticline that was at the mouth of Dry Creek Valley. We had our share of rain there and it was usually in the form of thunderstorms that came in the late afternoon. I can remember lying in my tent while the lighting struck the cliffs around us. We were camping out, cooking over an open fire and using stock water troughs as our coolers. We learned how to use a Brunton Compass, dip meter, plane table and alidale. To make a plane table map, you have a sheet of paper on a flat board on a tripod. Then the alidale is on the paper. Another student would go out with a survey rod and put it on places that had to be mapped. Using the alidale readings and bearings, you would convert them to distance to mark on the map. Later you would connect the points to draw a map of the area. We learned how to use a Brunton Compass that sometimes is called a pocket transit. We could take bearings with it, measure the strike and dip of geological beds. Dr. McMannis took us on short trips around the area to become familiar with the various formations we would be mapping. We went to the Natural Bridge Falls on the Boulder River southwest of Big Timber one day. Then we went up Hyalite Canyon south of Bozeman another day. We took a hike up a ridge above Dry Creek to see the surrounding area and to get an aerial view of the plunging anticline that we were mapping.

We were sort of roughing it as much as possible. We did not go into town while we were attending camp. We had an open fire to cook on and ditches in the woods for latrines. There was a snow fed creek that we could wash in when needed. After looking at the description of the present day field camp offered by Montana State University, we were really primitive. Nowadays, they stay in dorms and can eat in the school dining hall. They even have hot showers. My experience in mountain climbing and hiking really paid off for me. I had no problems with the conditions and could travel the area with ease in comparison to the trouble some of the fellow students from back east had. This was the type of geological exploration I thought it should be like. The nearest I came to this in the professional world was when I worked for the Montana State Bureau of Mines.

More on Page Three.


spacer Elder Bob using plane table.
Elder Bob using plane table and alidale to do geological mapping. Another student is off in distance holding survey rod to mark location of geological formation contact.
spacer Nap time.
This right after lunch time. We all took a short nap after busy morning of mapping.
spacer Livingston Peak.
One day we hiked up above our camp on Dry Creek to see more of the area. This is a view of Livingston Peak that still has snow on it.
spacer Anticline or ridge above Dry Creek.
On top of the ridge we were climbing above Dry Creek was an anticline.
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spacer Tilted beds east of Dry Creek.
A view from the top of the ridge we were climbing looking towards the Beartooth Mountain Range. The one ridge has beds that are tilted.
spacer Plunging Anticline.
Looking down fron the ridge to see the plunging anticline we were mapping at the mouth of the Dry Creek River Valley.
spacer Mill Creek Campsite.
A view of our second camp site near Mill Creek which was east of Pray Montana.
spacer Cliff above Mill Creek.
I had to do a lot of climbing in this area to get to various points to investigate. This is one cliff that I was near.
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spacer Students climbing up ravine.
Most of the time we were on our own, but at times, Dr. McMannis would take us to certain areas to show us a special feature. Here is a shot of the students climbing up a ravine with Dr. McMannis.
spacer View from Crystal Cave.
Further up Mill Creek Valley was a cave in the side of the ridge above the creek. This cave had calcite crystals in it.
spacer Dexter Peak.
A view of Dexter Peak that was in the area we were mapping.
spacer Castle Rock.
Castle Rock was an erosion remnant below Arrow Peak. Amazing on how many Castle Rocks there are in the United States.
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spacer View of Beartooth Mountain Range.
The Beartooth Mountains were a range east of the area we were mapping. That range extends down into Wyoming and Yellowstone National Park.
spacer Another Beartooth Range view.
Another view of Beartooth Mountain Range. They consisted more of igneous and metamorphic rocks. We were mainly mapping sedimentary rocks.
spacer Dead fawn.
One day when I was out on my own, I came across this fawn that was dead. I did not see any wounds on it and it was not in an area where it could have fallen from high up.
spacer Arrow Peak.
A view of Arrow Peak which was the highest peak in the area we were mapping. It was above Mill Creek and our camp site.
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spacer View up Mill Creek Valley.
A view up Mill Creek Valley.
spacer Looking towards Beartooth Range.
Another view of the Beartooth Mountains from the area we were mapping.
spacer Summit of Arrow Peak.
This is the summit of Arrow Peak with a carin on it. I had a good view of the surrounding area from the top of the peak.
spacer Looking down Arrow Peak from summit.
A view looking down from the top of Arrow Peak at the route I took to get to the summit.
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