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ELDER BOB’S FIELD CAMP PHOTOS - PAGE 1 OF 3


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spacer One of the requirements for my Geology Degree at the University of Puget Sound was that I had to take a summer field camp from another university because UPS did not offer one. I looked at the ones that were offered and decided to go to the one offered by Montana State College (later became Montana State University) located at Bozeman, Montana. I chose it because it was the cheapest one available. It was to be taught by Dr. William J. McMannis. It was for 5 weeks and only cost about $300 for tuition and about $200 for food. We would be camping out in tents so there was no charge for board. The area it would be in was Southeast of Livingston, Montana on the West Side of the Absaroka Mountains and was an interesting geological area. We would be learning various geological field techniques and also would do a geological map of an area around Arrow Peak which was near Pray, Montana. During the period of the camp, we would make a few field trips to see more examples of the formations we would be mapping. I was sent a list of items that I had to bring and had to get a shot for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Also I had to have a snake bite kit. There were ticks and rattlesnakes in the area. I never did see a snake and never found a tick on me. Every night when I got back to camp; I would strip down and check my body for ticks. The camp was from the end of June to the middle of July 1963.

This was the first time I had traveled such a long distance by myself. It was about 600 miles from Tacoma to Bozeman. I packed up my car which was a 1957 Simca and headed for Bozeman. I had problems going across Central Washington around Vantage with vapor lock. The fuel line was a plastic tube and I finally got to Vantage and bought some aluminum foil to wrap around the fuel line. That solved that problem. I did not get as far as I wanted to get that day. I had expected to make it to Missoula, Montana. I wound up camping at a scenic pull out along Coeur D’Alene Lake in Idaho.

The next day, I got up early and headed out for Bozeman. I saw a hitchhiker along the road that looked like a student. I wanted company, so I picked him up. He was going to Bozeman also. I would get there the day before the camp started, so he said I could bunk out at his place. We stopped at a greasy spoon place for something to eat some where in Montana. When we got to Bozeman, he took me to another greasy spoon place for supper. The following morning, I went over to the campus and found the geology building. I met Dr. McMannis and the rest of the students in the field camp who came from various universities around the country.

More on Page Two.


spacer Geology Lab Building.
View of a geology building at MSC. Jeep is one we used to transport supplies and equipment.
spacer Dry Creek River Camp Area.
Our first camp was located on Dry Creek which is southeast of Livingston, Montana. We were next to an abandoned homestead. One side of the valley had limestone cliffs and the other was covered with heavy growth of trees.
spacer Dry Creek River Valley.
This is looking down Dry Creek Valley towards Yellowstone River. Pond is a stock pond where the creek had been dammed up.
spacer Vertical Rock Beds.
This is one of the formations we were mapping. My geology pick is in the middle to be used as a reference of the size of the formation. My knapsack is on the right side.
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spacer Learning to use dip meter.
We were learning all the basic techniques used for field geology. Here we are using a home made dip meter to measure the dip of some rock beds that were dipping (at an angle) into the ground.
spacer Camp from valley side.
A view of our camp from up on the cliffs on the side of the valley.
spacer Limestone Cliff.
The cliffs on the side of Dry Creek Valley above our camp.
spacer Stock water troughs.
The area around us was used as grazing land for cattle. These are two logs hollowed out to be used as water troughs. The spring feeding them was enclosed inside a log fence. We used the troughs as a cooler for our food.
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spacer Cooking a camp meal.
To keep cost down for the camp, we did our own cooking as a community effort. Sometimes too many cooks spoiled the food.
spacer Boulder River.
We went on one field trip to Boulder River which is Southwest of Big Timber and east of Livingston.
spacer Natural Bridge Falls.
This is the Natural Bridge Falls on Boulder River. There use to be a rock bridge across the top of the falls, but it collapsed years ago.
spacer Overhang next to falls.
View of an overhang next to the falls. It had been carved out by the river over the years.
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spacer Elaphant Peak.
Another field trip we took was up Hyalite Canyon south of Bozeman. This is one of the peaks along the road up the canyon. It is called Elephant Peak.
spacer Hyalite Canyon wall.
The sides of Hyalite Canyon were almost vertical walls raising many feet high. There was still snow near the top of the walls.
spacer Hyalite Canyon water fall.
As we went up the canyon, we stopped at various places to look at the various formations. This is a waterfall at one of the stops with Dr. William J. McMannis in the foreground.
spacer Lunch break in Hyalite Canyon.
We stopped at this talus slope to have lunch in Hyalite Canyon.
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spacer Twin Falls.
This is Twin Falls. They are a very popular place in the winter for ice climbing by people from all over the states. The falls are located up Hyalite Canyon.
spacer Palisades Falls.
Palisades Falls are falls that go over columnar jointing in a lava flow.
spacer Columnar jointing.
Columnar jointing next to Palisades Falls. Devils Tower and Devils Postpile are other examples of columnar jointing.
spacer Camp pinups.
Our camp pinups. I found these posters in an old cabin next to our campsite on Dry Creek. I think they were originally used as ads for underwear.
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